Dietary quality, caloric intake, and adiposity of childhood cancer survivors and their siblings: An analysis from the cardiac risk factors in childhood cancer survivors study

David C. Landy, Stuart R. Lipsitz, Joy M. Kurtz, Andrea S. Hinkle, Louis S. Constine, M. Jacob Adams, Steven E Lipshultz, Tracie L Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, in part because of adiposity. Whether survivors have healthy diets and whether dietary quality is associated with adiposity among survivors are not known. Survivors and siblings from the Cardiac Risk Factors in Childhood Cancer Survivors Study completed 3-day food records that were used to estimate daily caloric intake relative to recommended and dietary quality using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI). Medical records were reviewed for cancer therapies. Body composition was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Of 91 childhood cancer survivors and 30 sibling controls, there were no marked differences in mean daily caloric intakes (98% vs. 100% of recommended) or HEI total scores (55.5 vs. 53.3), respectively, with both groups scoring worst for the consumption of dark green vegetables and whole grains. Survivors exposed to cranial irradiation had lower total HEI scores (-6.4, P = 0.01). Among survivors, better dietary quality, as reflected by the total HEI score, was associated with decreasing percent body fat (β = -0.19, P = 0.04). Survivors consume diets similar to their siblings although these diets are only moderately adherent to current guidelines. Decreased dietary quality is associated with higher body fat and receipt of cranial irradiation in survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)547-555
Number of pages9
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

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Adiposity
Energy Intake
Survivors
Siblings
Neoplasms
Cranial Irradiation
Adipose Tissue
Diet
Body Composition
Vegetables
Medical Records
Cardiovascular Diseases
X-Rays
Healthy Diet
Guidelines
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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Dietary quality, caloric intake, and adiposity of childhood cancer survivors and their siblings : An analysis from the cardiac risk factors in childhood cancer survivors study. / Landy, David C.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Kurtz, Joy M.; Hinkle, Andrea S.; Constine, Louis S.; Adams, M. Jacob; Lipshultz, Steven E; Miller, Tracie L.

In: Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 65, No. 4, 01.05.2013, p. 547-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Landy, David C. ; Lipsitz, Stuart R. ; Kurtz, Joy M. ; Hinkle, Andrea S. ; Constine, Louis S. ; Adams, M. Jacob ; Lipshultz, Steven E ; Miller, Tracie L. / Dietary quality, caloric intake, and adiposity of childhood cancer survivors and their siblings : An analysis from the cardiac risk factors in childhood cancer survivors study. In: Nutrition and Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 65, No. 4. pp. 547-555.
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