Dietary methionine imbalance, endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis

Michal J Toborek, Bernhard Hennig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dietary factors can play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. High fat, high calorie diets are well known risk factors for this disease. In addition, there is strong evidence that dietary animal proteins also can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Atherogenic effects of animal proteins are related, at least in part, to high levels of methionine in these proteins. An excess of dietary methionine may induce atherosclerosis by increasing plasma lipid levels and/or by contributing to endothelial cell injury or dysfunction. In addition, methionine imbalance elevates plasma/tissue homocysteine which may induce oxidative stress and injury to endothelial cells. Methionine and homocysteine metabolism is regulated by the cellular content of vitamins B6, B12, riboflavin and folic acid. Therefore, deficiencies of these vitamins may significantly influence methionine and homocysteine levels and their effects on the development of atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1251-1266
Number of pages16
JournalNutrition Research
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methionine
Atherosclerosis
Endothelial Cells
Homocysteine
Avitaminosis
Vitamin B 6
Dietary Proteins
Riboflavin
Wounds and Injuries
High Fat Diet
Vitamin B 12
Folic Acid
Proteins
Oxidative Stress
Lipids

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Endothelial Cells
  • Homocysteine
  • Methionine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Dietary methionine imbalance, endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis. / Toborek, Michal J; Hennig, Bernhard.

In: Nutrition Research, Vol. 16, No. 7, 01.07.1996, p. 1251-1266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{da1d14bc71d144b8a8438b375d6309b0,
title = "Dietary methionine imbalance, endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis",
abstract = "Dietary factors can play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. High fat, high calorie diets are well known risk factors for this disease. In addition, there is strong evidence that dietary animal proteins also can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Atherogenic effects of animal proteins are related, at least in part, to high levels of methionine in these proteins. An excess of dietary methionine may induce atherosclerosis by increasing plasma lipid levels and/or by contributing to endothelial cell injury or dysfunction. In addition, methionine imbalance elevates plasma/tissue homocysteine which may induce oxidative stress and injury to endothelial cells. Methionine and homocysteine metabolism is regulated by the cellular content of vitamins B6, B12, riboflavin and folic acid. Therefore, deficiencies of these vitamins may significantly influence methionine and homocysteine levels and their effects on the development of atherosclerosis.",
keywords = "Atherosclerosis, Endothelial Cells, Homocysteine, Methionine",
author = "Toborek, {Michal J} and Bernhard Hennig",
year = "1996",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0271-5317(96)00128-5",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "1251--1266",
journal = "Nutrition Research",
issn = "0271-5317",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary methionine imbalance, endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis

AU - Toborek, Michal J

AU - Hennig, Bernhard

PY - 1996/7/1

Y1 - 1996/7/1

N2 - Dietary factors can play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. High fat, high calorie diets are well known risk factors for this disease. In addition, there is strong evidence that dietary animal proteins also can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Atherogenic effects of animal proteins are related, at least in part, to high levels of methionine in these proteins. An excess of dietary methionine may induce atherosclerosis by increasing plasma lipid levels and/or by contributing to endothelial cell injury or dysfunction. In addition, methionine imbalance elevates plasma/tissue homocysteine which may induce oxidative stress and injury to endothelial cells. Methionine and homocysteine metabolism is regulated by the cellular content of vitamins B6, B12, riboflavin and folic acid. Therefore, deficiencies of these vitamins may significantly influence methionine and homocysteine levels and their effects on the development of atherosclerosis.

AB - Dietary factors can play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. High fat, high calorie diets are well known risk factors for this disease. In addition, there is strong evidence that dietary animal proteins also can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Atherogenic effects of animal proteins are related, at least in part, to high levels of methionine in these proteins. An excess of dietary methionine may induce atherosclerosis by increasing plasma lipid levels and/or by contributing to endothelial cell injury or dysfunction. In addition, methionine imbalance elevates plasma/tissue homocysteine which may induce oxidative stress and injury to endothelial cells. Methionine and homocysteine metabolism is regulated by the cellular content of vitamins B6, B12, riboflavin and folic acid. Therefore, deficiencies of these vitamins may significantly influence methionine and homocysteine levels and their effects on the development of atherosclerosis.

KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Endothelial Cells

KW - Homocysteine

KW - Methionine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030009984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030009984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0271-5317(96)00128-5

DO - 10.1016/0271-5317(96)00128-5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0030009984

VL - 16

SP - 1251

EP - 1266

JO - Nutrition Research

JF - Nutrition Research

SN - 0271-5317

IS - 7

ER -