Dietary intake is associated with risk of multiple myeloma and its precursor disease

Marianna Thordardottir, Ebba K. Lindqvist, Sigrun H. Lund, Rene Costello, Debra Burton, Laufey Steingrimsdottir, Neha Korde, Sham Mailankody, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Lenore J. Launer, Vilmundur Gudnason, Tamara B. Harris, Ola Landgren, Johanna E. Torfadottir, Sigurdur Y. Kristinsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The etiology of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), the precursor state of multiple myeloma (MM), is mostly unknown and no studies have been conducted on the effect of diet on MGUS or progression from MGUS to MM. We aimed to explore the association between common foods and MGUS and progression to MM. Data from the population-based AGES Study (N = 5,764) were utilized. Food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake during adolescence, midlife, and late life. Serum protein electrophoresis and serum free light-chain assay was performed to identify MGUS (n = 300) and LC-MGUS cases (n = 275). We cross linked our data with the Icelandic Cancer Registry to find cases of MM in the study group. We found that intake of fruit at least three times per week during adolescence was associated with lower risk of MGUS when compared to lower fruit consumption (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.95). We additionally found that intake of fruit at least three times per week during the late life period was associated with decreased risk of progressing from MGUS toMM (HR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.89) when compared to lower intake. Adolescent intake of fruit may reduce risk of MGUS, whereas fruit intake after MGUS onset may reduce risk of progressing to MM. Our findings suggest that diet might alter the risk of developing MGUS and progression to MM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0206047
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Dietary intake is associated with risk of multiple myeloma and its precursor disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this