Diel activity patterns of two distinct populations of Aedes aegypti in Miami, FL and Brownsville, TX

John Paul Mutebi, André Barretto Bruno Wilke, Erik Ostrum, Chalmers Vasquez, Gabriel Cardenas, Augusto Carvajal, Maday Moreno, William D. Petrie, Arturo Rodriguez, Henry Presas, Jesus Rodriguez, Fred Barnes, Gabriel L. Hamer, Jose G. Juarez, Ester Carbajal, Christopher J. Vitek, Xochitl Estrada, Thalia Rios, Jeremy Marshall, John C. Beier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The diel biting activity of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L) populations was extensively investigated in the early 1900s to gain more information on the biology of Ae. aegypti, and this information was used to devise effective approaches to controlling populations of this species and protect the human population from widespread arbovirus outbreaks. However, few contemporary studies are available regarding the diel activity patterns of Ae. aegypti. To assess the diel activity patterns of Ae. aegypti in southern Florida and Texas, we conducted 96-h uninterrupted mosquito collections once each month from May through November 2019 in Miami, Florida, and Brownsville, Texas, using BG-Sentinel 2 Traps. The overall diel activity pattern in both cities was bimodal with morning and evening peak activity between 7:00 and 8:00 and between 19:00 and 20:00. There were significant daily, monthly, seasonal, and site-specific differences in activity patterns, but these differences did not affect the overall peak activity times. These differences suggest daily, monthly, seasonal, and site-specific variations in human exposure to Ae. aegypti. Our observations can be used in planning and executing Ae. aegypti vector control activities in southern Florida and southern Texas, specifically those targeting the adult mosquito populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5315
JournalScientific reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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