Diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives in patients with symptomatic "carotid occlusion" referred for extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery.

Roberto Heros, L. N. Sekhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An increasing number of patients with symptomatic carotid artery occlusion are being referred for extracranial to intracranial bypass grafts. After careful clinical and angiographic assessment, a number of these patients have been treated with a direct approach to the carotid arteries in the neck or with anticoagulation rather than with a bypass graft. These patients may be categorized diagnostically under the following heading: 1) complete occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) with intracranial patency; 2) spontaneous dissection of the ICA: 3) atheromatous pseudo-occlusion; 4) carotid artery occlusion with stenosis of the contralateral ICA; 5) occlusion of the ICA and stenosis of the external carotid artery; and 6) thrombus in the intracranial segment of an occluded ICA. Each of these categories is discussed briefly, and illustrative cases are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)790-796
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume54
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Carotid Arteries
Carotid Stenosis
Internal Carotid Artery
Transplants
External Carotid Artery
Intracranial Thrombosis
Neck
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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