Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats

Parthasarathy Thirumala, James Zhou, Rohan Krishnan, Nihita Manem, Shreya Umredkar, D. K. Hamilton, Jeffrey R. Balzer, Martin Oudega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iatrogenic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a cause of potentially debilitating post-operative neurologic complications. Currently, intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) via somatosensory evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials is used to detect and prevent impending SCI. However, no empirically validated interventions exist to halt the progression of iatrogenic SCI once it is detected. This is in part due to the lack of a suitable translational model that mimics the circumstances surrounding iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM. Here, we evaluate a model of simulated contusive iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that transient losses of somatosensory evoked potentials responses are 88.24% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.53-98.20) and 80% specific (95% CI 51.91-95.43) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. Similarly, we show that transient losses in motor-evoked potentials responses are 70.83% sensitive (95% CI 48.91-87.33) and 100% specific (95% CI 62.91-100.00) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. These results indicate that our model is a suitable replica of the circumstances surrounding clinical iatrogenic SCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume25
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord Injuries
Evoked Potentials
Neurophysiological Monitoring
Confidence Intervals
Motor Evoked Potentials
Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
Nervous System
Sprague Dawley Rats

Keywords

  • Iatrogenic
  • Injury
  • MEP
  • Neurophysiology
  • Spine
  • SSEP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats. / Thirumala, Parthasarathy; Zhou, James; Krishnan, Rohan; Manem, Nihita; Umredkar, Shreya; Hamilton, D. K.; Balzer, Jeffrey R.; Oudega, Martin.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 25, 01.03.2016, p. 122-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thirumala, Parthasarathy ; Zhou, James ; Krishnan, Rohan ; Manem, Nihita ; Umredkar, Shreya ; Hamilton, D. K. ; Balzer, Jeffrey R. ; Oudega, Martin. / Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats. In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience. 2016 ; Vol. 25. pp. 122-126.
@article{b083be9f471e44859a25fefa6226e7e8,
title = "Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats",
abstract = "Iatrogenic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a cause of potentially debilitating post-operative neurologic complications. Currently, intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) via somatosensory evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials is used to detect and prevent impending SCI. However, no empirically validated interventions exist to halt the progression of iatrogenic SCI once it is detected. This is in part due to the lack of a suitable translational model that mimics the circumstances surrounding iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM. Here, we evaluate a model of simulated contusive iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that transient losses of somatosensory evoked potentials responses are 88.24{\%} sensitive (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 63.53-98.20) and 80{\%} specific (95{\%} CI 51.91-95.43) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. Similarly, we show that transient losses in motor-evoked potentials responses are 70.83{\%} sensitive (95{\%} CI 48.91-87.33) and 100{\%} specific (95{\%} CI 62.91-100.00) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. These results indicate that our model is a suitable replica of the circumstances surrounding clinical iatrogenic SCI.",
keywords = "Iatrogenic, Injury, MEP, Neurophysiology, Spine, SSEP",
author = "Parthasarathy Thirumala and James Zhou and Rohan Krishnan and Nihita Manem and Shreya Umredkar and Hamilton, {D. K.} and Balzer, {Jeffrey R.} and Martin Oudega",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jocn.2015.10.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "122--126",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Neuroscience",
issn = "0967-5868",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats

AU - Thirumala, Parthasarathy

AU - Zhou, James

AU - Krishnan, Rohan

AU - Manem, Nihita

AU - Umredkar, Shreya

AU - Hamilton, D. K.

AU - Balzer, Jeffrey R.

AU - Oudega, Martin

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Iatrogenic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a cause of potentially debilitating post-operative neurologic complications. Currently, intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) via somatosensory evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials is used to detect and prevent impending SCI. However, no empirically validated interventions exist to halt the progression of iatrogenic SCI once it is detected. This is in part due to the lack of a suitable translational model that mimics the circumstances surrounding iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM. Here, we evaluate a model of simulated contusive iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that transient losses of somatosensory evoked potentials responses are 88.24% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.53-98.20) and 80% specific (95% CI 51.91-95.43) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. Similarly, we show that transient losses in motor-evoked potentials responses are 70.83% sensitive (95% CI 48.91-87.33) and 100% specific (95% CI 62.91-100.00) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. These results indicate that our model is a suitable replica of the circumstances surrounding clinical iatrogenic SCI.

AB - Iatrogenic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a cause of potentially debilitating post-operative neurologic complications. Currently, intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) via somatosensory evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials is used to detect and prevent impending SCI. However, no empirically validated interventions exist to halt the progression of iatrogenic SCI once it is detected. This is in part due to the lack of a suitable translational model that mimics the circumstances surrounding iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM. Here, we evaluate a model of simulated contusive iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that transient losses of somatosensory evoked potentials responses are 88.24% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.53-98.20) and 80% specific (95% CI 51.91-95.43) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. Similarly, we show that transient losses in motor-evoked potentials responses are 70.83% sensitive (95% CI 48.91-87.33) and 100% specific (95% CI 62.91-100.00) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. These results indicate that our model is a suitable replica of the circumstances surrounding clinical iatrogenic SCI.

KW - Iatrogenic

KW - Injury

KW - MEP

KW - Neurophysiology

KW - Spine

KW - SSEP

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84956588886&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84956588886&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jocn.2015.10.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jocn.2015.10.010

M3 - Article

C2 - 26677784

AN - SCOPUS:84956588886

VL - 25

SP - 122

EP - 126

JO - Journal of Clinical Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Clinical Neuroscience

SN - 0967-5868

ER -