Diabetes, cognitive decline, and mild cognitive impairment among diverse Hispanics/ Latinos: Study of Latinos–Investigation of neurocognitive aging results (HCHS/SOL)

Hector M. González, Wassim Tarraf, Kevin A. González, Myriam Fornage, Donglin Zeng, Linda C. Gallo, Gregory A. Talavera, Martha L. Daviglus, Richard B. Lipton, Robert Kaplan, Alberto R. Ramos, Melissa Lamar, Jianwen Cai, Charles DeCarli, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic/racial group in the U.S., have the highest prevalence of diabetes, and are at increased risk for neurodegenerative disorders. Currently, little is known about the relationship between diabetes and cognitive decline and disorders among diverse Hispanics/Latinos. The purpose of this study is to clarify these relationships in diverse middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Study of Latinos–Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging (SOL-INCA) is an ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). HCHS/ SOL is a multisite (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; and San Diego, CA), probability-sampled (i.e., representative of targeted populations), and prospective cohort study. Between 2016 and 2018, SOL-INCA enrolled diverse Hispanics/Latinos aged ‡50 years (n 5 6,377). Global cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were the primary outcomes. RESULTS Prevalent diabetes at visit 1, but not incident diabetes at visit 2, was associated with significantly steeper global cognitive decline (bGC 5 20.16 [95% CI 20.25; 20.07]; P < 0.001), domain-specific cognitive decline, and higher odds of MCI (odds ratio 1.74 [95% CI 1.34; 2.26]; P < 0.001) compared with no diabetes in age- and sex-adjusted models. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes was associated with cognitive decline and increased MCI prevalence among diverse Hispanics/Latinos, primarily among those with prevalent diabetes at visit 1. Our findings suggest that significant cognitive decline and MCI may be considered additional disease complications of diabetes among diverse middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1111-1117
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes care
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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    González, H. M., Tarraf, W., González, K. A., Fornage, M., Zeng, D., Gallo, L. C., Talavera, G. A., Daviglus, M. L., Lipton, R. B., Kaplan, R., Ramos, A. R., Lamar, M., Cai, J., DeCarli, C., & Schneiderman, N. (2020). Diabetes, cognitive decline, and mild cognitive impairment among diverse Hispanics/ Latinos: Study of Latinos–Investigation of neurocognitive aging results (HCHS/SOL). Diabetes care, 43(5), 1111-1117. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc19-1676