Developmental brain anomalies in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Peg Nopoulos, Stephanie Berg, F. Xavier Castellenos, Aymin Delgado, Nancy C. Andreasen, Judith L. Rapoport

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathoetiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been considered to be neurodevelopmental, yet the timing and processes involved are not clearly identified. Neurodevelopmental brain anomalies have been associated with a variety of psychiatric conditions. However, they have never been evaluated in a population of patients with ADHD. This study was designed to determine the frequency of specific developmental brain anomalies in a group of children with ADHD (n = 85; mean age, 10.9 years) and healthy control children (n = 95; mean age, 11.7 years) by visually inspecting brain magnetic resonance imaging scans. Compared to controls, the ADHD group showed an increase in frequency of two developmental anomalies: (1) gray-matter heterotopia, a neuronal migration anomaly, in 2 of 85 patients versus 0 of 95 controls; and (2) posterior fossa abnormality (excess cerebrospinal fluid in the posterior fossa) in 8 of 85 patients versus 2 of 95 controls. There were no differences in frequency of enlarged cavum septi pellucidi between the two groups. These findings support and extend the idea that ADHD is of developmental origin, and further suggest that the timing of aberrant brain development could be in early gestation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-108
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume15
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2000

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Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Brain
Psychiatry
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pregnancy
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Nopoulos, P., Berg, S., Castellenos, F. X., Delgado, A., Andreasen, N. C., & Rapoport, J. L. (2000). Developmental brain anomalies in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Child Neurology, 15(2), 102-108.

Developmental brain anomalies in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. / Nopoulos, Peg; Berg, Stephanie; Castellenos, F. Xavier; Delgado, Aymin; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Rapoport, Judith L.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.02.2000, p. 102-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nopoulos, P, Berg, S, Castellenos, FX, Delgado, A, Andreasen, NC & Rapoport, JL 2000, 'Developmental brain anomalies in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder', Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 102-108.
Nopoulos P, Berg S, Castellenos FX, Delgado A, Andreasen NC, Rapoport JL. Developmental brain anomalies in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Child Neurology. 2000 Feb 1;15(2):102-108.
Nopoulos, Peg ; Berg, Stephanie ; Castellenos, F. Xavier ; Delgado, Aymin ; Andreasen, Nancy C. ; Rapoport, Judith L. / Developmental brain anomalies in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In: Journal of Child Neurology. 2000 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 102-108.
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