Development of retroviral vectors that target hematopoietic stem cells

Chris A. Benedict, Yi Zhao, Noriyuki Kasahara, Paula M. Cannon, W. French Anderson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION Allografting is a well-documented curative therapy for patients with leukemias and other hematological malignancies. Conventional myeloablative regimens for allografting usually involve high-dose chemotherapy alone or in combination with total body irradiation. Such regimens have been considered to be essential for allografting, because they do eliminate from the marrow the host hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) (and therefore they make “space” for the donor HPCs), avoid rejection of these cells, and drastically reduce or eliminate the neoplastic cells of the host (1,2). Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mechanism of tumor cell control is due to the alloreactivity of donor immune cells, and therefore adoptive allogeneic therapy plays a fundamental role mainly in chronic myelogenous leukemia (3), but also in other hematological neoplasias (4). Considering that it is now possible to eradicate high tumor burdens by adoptive allogeneic therapy through donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) in patients relapsing after high-dose myeloablative approaches, the crucial question is: Is the myeloablation still essential considering that the induction of host-versus-graft tolerance is usually accomplished by successful stable donor cell engraftment?.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
PublisherCRC Press
Pages575-593
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9780824741815
ISBN (Print)9780824702731
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Homologous Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Play Therapy
Transplantation Tolerance
Whole-Body Irradiation
Hematologic Neoplasms
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Tumor Burden
Neoplasms
Leukemia
Bone Marrow
Lymphocytes
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Benedict, C. A., Zhao, Y., Kasahara, N., Cannon, P. M., & Anderson, W. F. (2000). Development of retroviral vectors that target hematopoietic stem cells. In Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (pp. 575-593). CRC Press.

Development of retroviral vectors that target hematopoietic stem cells. / Benedict, Chris A.; Zhao, Yi; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Cannon, Paula M.; Anderson, W. French.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. CRC Press, 2000. p. 575-593.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Benedict, CA, Zhao, Y, Kasahara, N, Cannon, PM & Anderson, WF 2000, Development of retroviral vectors that target hematopoietic stem cells. in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. CRC Press, pp. 575-593.
Benedict CA, Zhao Y, Kasahara N, Cannon PM, Anderson WF. Development of retroviral vectors that target hematopoietic stem cells. In Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. CRC Press. 2000. p. 575-593
Benedict, Chris A. ; Zhao, Yi ; Kasahara, Noriyuki ; Cannon, Paula M. ; Anderson, W. French. / Development of retroviral vectors that target hematopoietic stem cells. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. CRC Press, 2000. pp. 575-593
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