Development and Evaluation of Machine Learning Models for Recovery Prediction after Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury

Hannah L. Radabaugh, Jerry Bonnell, W. Dalton DIetrich, Helen Bramlett, Odelia Schwartz, DIlip Sarkar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability yet treatment strategies remain elusive. Advances in machine learning present exciting opportunities for developing personalized medicine and informing laboratory research. However, their feasibility has yet to be widely assessed in animal research where data are typically limited or in the TBI field where each patient presents with a unique injury. The Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT) has amassed an animal dataset that spans multiple types of injury, treatment strategies, behavioral assessments, histological measures, and biomarker screenings. This paper aims to analyze these data using supervised learning techniques for the first time by partitioning the dataset into acute input metrics (i.e. 7 days post-injury) and a defined recovery outcome (i.e. memory retention). Preprocessing is then applied to transform the raw OBTT dataset, e.g. developing a class attribute by histogram binning, eliminating borderline cases, and applying principal component analysis (PCA). We find that these steps are also useful in establishing a treatment ranking; Minocycline, a therapy with no significant findings in the OBTT analyses, yields the highest percentage recovery in our ranking. Furthermore, of the seven classifiers we have evaluated, Naïve Bayes achieves the best performance (67%) and yields significant improvement over our baseline model on the preprocessed dataset with borderline elimination. We also investigate the effect of testing on individual treatment groups to evaluate which groups are difficult to classify, and note the interpretive qualities of our model that can be clinically relevant.Clinical Relevance - These studies establish methods for better analyzing multivariate functional recovery and understanding which measures affect prognosis following traumatic brain injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication42nd Annual International Conferences of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEnabling Innovative Technologies for Global Healthcare, EMBC 2020
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages2416-2420
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781728119908
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020
Event42nd Annual International Conferences of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2020 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: Jul 20 2020Jul 24 2020

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
Volume2020-July
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Conference

Conference42nd Annual International Conferences of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2020
CountryCanada
CityMontreal
Period7/20/207/24/20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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  • Cite this

    Radabaugh, H. L., Bonnell, J., DIetrich, W. D., Bramlett, H., Schwartz, O., & Sarkar, DI. (2020). Development and Evaluation of Machine Learning Models for Recovery Prediction after Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury. In 42nd Annual International Conferences of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Enabling Innovative Technologies for Global Healthcare, EMBC 2020 (pp. 2416-2420). [9175658] (Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS; Vol. 2020-July). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC44109.2020.9175658