Developing a safe intravenous sotalol dosing regimen

John C. Somberg, Richard A Preston, Vasant Ranade, Janos Molnar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, an intravenous formulation of sotalol has been approved by the food and drug administration for substitution for oral therapy in patients who are unable to take oral sotalol. The purpose of this randomized, 2-treatment, 2-period, crossover study was to develop a safe dosing regimen for intravenous sotalol that provides similar blood levels and therefore similar efficacy and safety to orally administered sotalol. Fifteen healthy subjects received 75 mg intravenous sotalol infusion administered over 2.5 hours and 80 mg oral sotalol. Standard pharmacokinetic methods were used to obtain maximum serum concentrations (Cmax) and areas under the concentration-time curves (AUC). Individual pharmacokinetic parameters were used in simulation studies to determine the optimal intravenous administration regimen. Intravenous sotalol administered over 2.5 hours resulted in a significantly greater Cmax than oral administration (830 ± 391 vs. 601 ± 289 ng/mL, P < 0.001). With increasing the length of infusions to 3, 4, and 5 hours, simulation studies showed that the Cmax decreased to 128%, 113%, and 102% of the oral Cmax. The length of infusion did not affect AUC. Based on these studies, a safe intravenous regimen for the replacement of 80-mg oral therapy requires 75 mg intravenous sotalol administered as a 5-hour infusion. Because the pharmacokinetics of sotalol are linear and dose proportional, 150 mg intravenous sotalol administered over 5 hours will provide similar Cmax and AUC as 160 mg oral sotalol. The food and drug administration-approved dosing regimen is 75 mg intravenous sotalol to replace 80 mg oral sotalol and 150 mg intravenous sotalol to replace 160 mg oral sotalol, both administered over 5 hours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-372
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Therapeutics
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

Fingerprint

Sotalol
Pharmacokinetics
United States Food and Drug Administration
Drug Substitution

Keywords

  • dosing and administration
  • intravenous sotalol
  • pharmacodynamics
  • pharmacokinetics
  • QT interval

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Developing a safe intravenous sotalol dosing regimen. / Somberg, John C.; Preston, Richard A; Ranade, Vasant; Molnar, Janos.

In: American Journal of Therapeutics, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.07.2010, p. 365-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Somberg, John C. ; Preston, Richard A ; Ranade, Vasant ; Molnar, Janos. / Developing a safe intravenous sotalol dosing regimen. In: American Journal of Therapeutics. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 365-372.
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