Detection and quantitation of circulating immune complexes in arterial blood of patients with rheumatic disease

Richard S. Panush, Paul Katz, Selden Longley, Richard A. Yonker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We developed antigen-nonspecific enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) to quantitate IgG-C3- and IgM-C3-containing circulating immune complexes (CIC) in venous and arterial blood from rheumatic disease patients. Standards were diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-purified, heat-aggregated IgG incubated with fresh human serum (for IgG-C3 CIC) and IgM rheumatoid factor-rich serum incubated with reduced, alkylated IgG and then with fresh human serum (for IgM-IgG-C3 CIC). Venous serum and plasma IgG-C3 and IgM-C3 CIC correlated closely (P < 0.01). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) patients had elevated levels of venous IgM-C3 CIC (P < 0.0001) but not IgG-C3 aIC; patients with vasculitis, inflammatory rheumatic diseases, or noninflammatory rheumatic diseases had mean values similar to normal individuals. Venous IgG-C3 and IgM-C3 CIC did not correlate. Paired venous and arterial samples from 16 rheumatic disease patients averaged comparable amounts of IgG-C3 and IgM-C3 CIC, respectively; venous and arterial IgM-C3 CIC levels in patients significantly exceeded normals (P < 0.01) Venous and arterial IgG-C3 CIC levels correlated closely (P < 0.01) as did venous dnd arterial IgM-C3 levels (P < 0.05). Thus, arterial CIC offered no advantage over venous determinations for rheumatic disease patients. IgM-C3 CIC were elevated in patients with RA and SLE when IgG-C3 CIC were not. Ig isotype-specific CIC quantitation may be useful for certain rheumatic diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-226
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Immunology and Immunopathology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Antigen-Antibody Complex
Rheumatic Diseases
Immunoglobulin M
Immunoglobulin G
Serum
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Hematologic Diseases
Rheumatoid Factor
Vasculitis
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Detection and quantitation of circulating immune complexes in arterial blood of patients with rheumatic disease. / Panush, Richard S.; Katz, Paul; Longley, Selden; Yonker, Richard A.

In: Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.01.1985, p. 217-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Panush, Richard S. ; Katz, Paul ; Longley, Selden ; Yonker, Richard A. / Detection and quantitation of circulating immune complexes in arterial blood of patients with rheumatic disease. In: Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology. 1985 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 217-226.
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