Detailed phenotyping of posterior vs. anterior circulation ischemic stroke: a multi-center MRI study

the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC), and the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (PCiS) constitutes 20–30% of ischemic stroke cases. Detailed information about differences between PCiS and anterior circulation ischemic stroke (ACiS) remains scarce. Such information might guide clinical decision making and prevention strategies. We studied risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes in PCiS vs. ACiS and lesion location on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in PCiS. Methods: Out of 3,301 MRIs from 12 sites in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), we included 2,381 cases with acute DWI lesions. The definition of ACiS or PCiS was based on lesion location. We compared the groups using Chi-squared and logistic regression. Results: PCiS occurred in 718 (30%) patients and ACiS in 1663 (70%). Diabetes and male sex were more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (diabetes 27% vs. 23%, p < 0.05; male sex 68% vs. 58%, p < 0.001). Both were independently associated with PCiS (diabetes, OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.04–1.61; male sex, OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.21–1.78). ACiS more commonly had large artery atherosclerosis (25% vs. 20%, p < 0.01) and cardioembolic mechanisms (17% vs. 11%, p < 0.001) compared to PCiS. Small artery occlusion was more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (20% vs. 14%, p < 0.001). Small artery occlusion accounted for 47% of solitary brainstem infarctions. Conclusion: Ischemic stroke subtypes differ between the two phenotypes. Diabetes and male sex have a stronger association with PCiS than ACiS. Definitive MRI-based PCiS diagnosis aids etiological investigation and contributes additional insights into specific risk factors and mechanisms of injury in PCiS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Neurology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stroke
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Arteries
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Brain Stem Infarctions

Keywords

  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Phenotyping
  • Posterior circulation brain infarction
  • Risk factors
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC), and the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) Study (Accepted/In press). Detailed phenotyping of posterior vs. anterior circulation ischemic stroke: a multi-center MRI study. Journal of Neurology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-019-09613-5

Detailed phenotyping of posterior vs. anterior circulation ischemic stroke : a multi-center MRI study. / the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC), and the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) Study.

In: Journal of Neurology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC), and the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) Study 2019, 'Detailed phenotyping of posterior vs. anterior circulation ischemic stroke: a multi-center MRI study', Journal of Neurology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-019-09613-5
the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC), and the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) Study. Detailed phenotyping of posterior vs. anterior circulation ischemic stroke: a multi-center MRI study. Journal of Neurology. 2019 Jan 1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-019-09613-5
the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC), and the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) Study. / Detailed phenotyping of posterior vs. anterior circulation ischemic stroke : a multi-center MRI study. In: Journal of Neurology. 2019.
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abstract = "Objective: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (PCiS) constitutes 20–30{\%} of ischemic stroke cases. Detailed information about differences between PCiS and anterior circulation ischemic stroke (ACiS) remains scarce. Such information might guide clinical decision making and prevention strategies. We studied risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes in PCiS vs. ACiS and lesion location on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in PCiS. Methods: Out of 3,301 MRIs from 12 sites in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), we included 2,381 cases with acute DWI lesions. The definition of ACiS or PCiS was based on lesion location. We compared the groups using Chi-squared and logistic regression. Results: PCiS occurred in 718 (30{\%}) patients and ACiS in 1663 (70{\%}). Diabetes and male sex were more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (diabetes 27{\%} vs. 23{\%}, p < 0.05; male sex 68{\%} vs. 58{\%}, p < 0.001). Both were independently associated with PCiS (diabetes, OR = 1.29; 95{\%} CI 1.04–1.61; male sex, OR = 1.46; 95{\%} CI 1.21–1.78). ACiS more commonly had large artery atherosclerosis (25{\%} vs. 20{\%}, p < 0.01) and cardioembolic mechanisms (17{\%} vs. 11{\%}, p < 0.001) compared to PCiS. Small artery occlusion was more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (20{\%} vs. 14{\%}, p < 0.001). Small artery occlusion accounted for 47{\%} of solitary brainstem infarctions. Conclusion: Ischemic stroke subtypes differ between the two phenotypes. Diabetes and male sex have a stronger association with PCiS than ACiS. Definitive MRI-based PCiS diagnosis aids etiological investigation and contributes additional insights into specific risk factors and mechanisms of injury in PCiS.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Detailed phenotyping of posterior vs. anterior circulation ischemic stroke

T2 - a multi-center MRI study

AU - the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC), and the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) Study

AU - Frid, Petrea

AU - Drake, Mattias

AU - Giese, A. K.

AU - Wasselius, J.

AU - Schirmer, M. D.

AU - Donahue, K. L.

AU - Cloonan, L.

AU - Irie, R.

AU - Bouts, M. J.R.J.

AU - McIntosh, E. C.

AU - Mocking, S. J.T.

AU - Dalca, A. V.

AU - Sridharan, R.

AU - Xu, H.

AU - Giralt-Steinhauer, E.

AU - Holmegaard, L.

AU - Jood, K.

AU - Roquer, J.

AU - Cole, J. W.

AU - McArdle, P. F.

AU - Broderick, J. P.

AU - Jimenez-Conde, J.

AU - Jern, C.

AU - Kissela, B. M.

AU - Kleindorfer, D. O.

AU - Lemmens, R.

AU - Meschia, J. F.

AU - Rundek, T.

AU - Sacco, R. L.

AU - Schmidt, R.

AU - Sharma, P.

AU - Slowik, A.

AU - Thijs, V.

AU - Woo, D.

AU - Worrall, B. B.

AU - Kittner, S. J.

AU - Mitchell, B. D.

AU - Petersson, J.

AU - Rosand, J.

AU - Golland, P.

AU - Wu, O.

AU - Rost, N. S.

AU - Lindgren, A.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (PCiS) constitutes 20–30% of ischemic stroke cases. Detailed information about differences between PCiS and anterior circulation ischemic stroke (ACiS) remains scarce. Such information might guide clinical decision making and prevention strategies. We studied risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes in PCiS vs. ACiS and lesion location on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in PCiS. Methods: Out of 3,301 MRIs from 12 sites in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), we included 2,381 cases with acute DWI lesions. The definition of ACiS or PCiS was based on lesion location. We compared the groups using Chi-squared and logistic regression. Results: PCiS occurred in 718 (30%) patients and ACiS in 1663 (70%). Diabetes and male sex were more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (diabetes 27% vs. 23%, p < 0.05; male sex 68% vs. 58%, p < 0.001). Both were independently associated with PCiS (diabetes, OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.04–1.61; male sex, OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.21–1.78). ACiS more commonly had large artery atherosclerosis (25% vs. 20%, p < 0.01) and cardioembolic mechanisms (17% vs. 11%, p < 0.001) compared to PCiS. Small artery occlusion was more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (20% vs. 14%, p < 0.001). Small artery occlusion accounted for 47% of solitary brainstem infarctions. Conclusion: Ischemic stroke subtypes differ between the two phenotypes. Diabetes and male sex have a stronger association with PCiS than ACiS. Definitive MRI-based PCiS diagnosis aids etiological investigation and contributes additional insights into specific risk factors and mechanisms of injury in PCiS.

AB - Objective: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (PCiS) constitutes 20–30% of ischemic stroke cases. Detailed information about differences between PCiS and anterior circulation ischemic stroke (ACiS) remains scarce. Such information might guide clinical decision making and prevention strategies. We studied risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes in PCiS vs. ACiS and lesion location on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in PCiS. Methods: Out of 3,301 MRIs from 12 sites in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), we included 2,381 cases with acute DWI lesions. The definition of ACiS or PCiS was based on lesion location. We compared the groups using Chi-squared and logistic regression. Results: PCiS occurred in 718 (30%) patients and ACiS in 1663 (70%). Diabetes and male sex were more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (diabetes 27% vs. 23%, p < 0.05; male sex 68% vs. 58%, p < 0.001). Both were independently associated with PCiS (diabetes, OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.04–1.61; male sex, OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.21–1.78). ACiS more commonly had large artery atherosclerosis (25% vs. 20%, p < 0.01) and cardioembolic mechanisms (17% vs. 11%, p < 0.001) compared to PCiS. Small artery occlusion was more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (20% vs. 14%, p < 0.001). Small artery occlusion accounted for 47% of solitary brainstem infarctions. Conclusion: Ischemic stroke subtypes differ between the two phenotypes. Diabetes and male sex have a stronger association with PCiS than ACiS. Definitive MRI-based PCiS diagnosis aids etiological investigation and contributes additional insights into specific risk factors and mechanisms of injury in PCiS.

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Phenotyping

KW - Posterior circulation brain infarction

KW - Risk factors

KW - Stroke

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