Derivation of autism spectrum disorder-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells

Brooke A. DeRosa, Jessica M. Van Baaren, Gaurav K. Dubey, Joycelyn M. Lee, Michael L. Cuccaro, Jeffery M. Vance, Margaret A. Pericak-Vance, Derek M. Dykxhoorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold tremendous potential both as a biological tool to uncover the pathophysiology of disease by creating relevant cell models and as a source of stem cells for cell-based therapeutic applications. Typically, iPSCs have been derived by the transgenic overexpression of transcription factors associated with progenitor cell or stem cell function in fibroblasts derived from skin biopsies. However, the need for skin punch biopsies to derive fibroblasts for reprogramming can present a barrier to study participation among certain populations of individuals, including children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In addition, the acquisition of skin punch biopsies in non-clinic settings presents a challenge. One potential mechanism to avoid these limitations would be the use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as the source of the cells for reprogramming. In this article we describe, for the first time, the derivation of iPSC lines from PBMCs isolated from the whole blood of autistic children, and their subsequent differentiation in GABAergic neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-14
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume516
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2012

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • Differentiation
  • Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)
  • Reprogramming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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