Depression, Self-Esteem, and Childhood Abuse Among Hispanic Men Residing in the U.S.-Mexico Border Region

Elias Provencio-Vasquez, Holly J. Mata, Joe Tomaka, Joseph P. De Santis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hispanics experience health disparities in mental health and HIV infection when compared to non-Hispanic Whites, which may be related to childhood abuse. The purpose of our cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between childhood abuse and depressive symptoms in a sample of Hispanic men (N = 103) living in a metropolitan U.S.-Mexico border area. Secondarily, we examined the role of self-esteem in mediating this relationship, and the moderating role of sexual orientation. Gay/bisexual men (n = 53) were more likely to report childhood abuse than heterosexual (n = 50) counterparts (47.2% vs. 32%). Self-esteem mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and depression for men who have sex with men, but not heterosexual men. Nurses should increase knowledge of mental health disparities that impact Hispanic men to ensure that appropriate treatment can be provided to reduce the risk of co-occurring health risks to these men, including risk for HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Keywords

  • Childhood abuse
  • Depression
  • Hispanic men
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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