Delayed myeloradiculopathy produced by spinal X-irradiation in the rat

Walter G Bradley, J. D. Fewings, W. J K Cumming, R. M. Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rats were subjected to 3,500 r of X-irradiation in a single dose while breathing oxygen at 1 atm pressure. Comparison was made between the delayed effects of irradiating thoracic, lumbar, and the cauda equina fields. The lumbar field involved the alpha-motoneurons and spinal roots supplying the sciatic nerve, while the cauda equina field involved these spinal roots but spared the alpha-motoneurons in the spinal cord. Thoracic irradiation produced paraplegia after an interval of 127-150 days. In the irradiated zone, the spinal cord was severely damaged, but the thoracic spinal roots were spared. Lumbar irradiation produced paraplegia after an interval of 83-211 days. In the irradiated zone, the alpha-motoneurons were largely spared, the spinal cord showed mild to moderate white matter damage, but the most severe damage was of the lumbosacral spinal roots. The posterior roots were more affected than the anterior. In longer interval cases the degeneration of the roots appeared to be due to focal devitalization. Evidence is advanced that root degeneration had been progressing for at least 4 weeks before the onset of paraplegia. In the cauda equina series the lumbosacral spinal root changes were similar to those in the lumbar series. This study indicates that different levels of the neuraxis have different degrees of susceptibility to X-irradiation. The thoracic cord appears more susceptible than the lumbosacral; the lumbosacral roots appear more susceptible than the thoracic; the posterior roots are more susceptible than the anterior. These findings may have relevance to the study of radiation damage in man, even though the dose schedule used in this experimental study differs greatly from that used for radiotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-82
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spinal Nerve Roots
Cauda Equina
Paraplegia
Spinal Cord
Motor Neurons
Thorax
Sciatic Nerve
Appointments and Schedules
Respiration
Radiotherapy
Radiation
Oxygen
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Delayed myeloradiculopathy produced by spinal X-irradiation in the rat. / Bradley, Walter G; Fewings, J. D.; Cumming, W. J K; Harrison, R. M.

In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.1977, p. 63-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bradley, Walter G ; Fewings, J. D. ; Cumming, W. J K ; Harrison, R. M. / Delayed myeloradiculopathy produced by spinal X-irradiation in the rat. In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 1977 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 63-82.
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