Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical Efficacy and Future Directions for Enhancing Motor Function

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a well-established procedure that produces a significant improvement in motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). While the motor function improvement has been documented extensively, the effects of DBS on non-motor symptoms, such as sleep, cognition, and mood, have been less studied. This review will summarize the extensive clinical evidence on the effects of DBS in PD, and emerging evidence on non-motor symptoms as well as the advances in technology that allows a more precise lead placement and better outcomes. Future directions in the field of neuromodulation and strategies to improve overall brain function will be reviewed. The recent advances in technology provide the ability to deliver stimulation adaptively based on cortical and subcortical brain signals, and subsequently a more physiological and precise modulation of the impaired motor network.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationContemporary Clinical Neuroscience
PublisherSpringer Nature
Pages463-483
Number of pages21
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Publication series

NameContemporary Clinical Neuroscience
ISSN (Print)2627-535X
ISSN (Electronic)2627-5341

Keywords

  • Closed-loop DBS
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Local field potentials
  • Microelectrode recordings
  • Neuromodulation
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Subthalamic nucleus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

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