Declining trends in serum cotinine levels in US worker groups

The power of policy

Kristopher Arheart, David J Lee, Noella Dietz, James D. Wilkinson, John D. Clark, William G. LeBlanc, Berrin Serdar, Lora E. Fleming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To explore trends in cotinine levels in US worker groups. METHODS: Using NHANES III data, serum cotinine levels of US workers not smokers nor exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) at home were evaluated for trends by occupational/industrial and race/ethnicity-gender sub-groups. RESULTS: Decreases from 1988 to 2002 ranged from 0.08 to 0.30 ng/mL (67% to 85% relative decrease), with largest absolute reductions in: blue-collar and service occupations; construction/manufacturing industrial sectors; non-Hispanic Black male workers. CONCLUSIONS: All worker groups had declining serum cotinine levels. Most dramatic reductions occurred in sub-groups with the highest before cotinine levels, thus disparities in SHS workforce exposure are diminishing with increased adoption of clean indoor laws. However, Black male workers, construction/manufacturing sector workers, and blue-collar and service workers have the highest cotinine levels. Further reductions in SHS exposure will require widespread adoption of workplace clean air laws without exemptions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-63
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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Cotinine
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Serum
Nutrition Surveys
Occupations
Workplace
Air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Declining trends in serum cotinine levels in US worker groups : The power of policy. / Arheart, Kristopher; Lee, David J; Dietz, Noella; Wilkinson, James D.; Clark, John D.; LeBlanc, William G.; Serdar, Berrin; Fleming, Lora E.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 57-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arheart, K, Lee, DJ, Dietz, N, Wilkinson, JD, Clark, JD, LeBlanc, WG, Serdar, B & Fleming, LE 2008, 'Declining trends in serum cotinine levels in US worker groups: The power of policy', Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 57-63. https://doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0b013e318158a486
Arheart, Kristopher ; Lee, David J ; Dietz, Noella ; Wilkinson, James D. ; Clark, John D. ; LeBlanc, William G. ; Serdar, Berrin ; Fleming, Lora E. / Declining trends in serum cotinine levels in US worker groups : The power of policy. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 57-63.
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