Death, democracy and public ethical choice.

Reid Cushman, Soren Holm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Danish Council of Ethics...believed that the brain-death criterion should not be accepted without public education and debate. Following the introduction of a spectrum of educational and related activites, a Gallup poll found that 98% of the survey population was aware of the debate over brain-vs-heart criteria and that 80% favoured the adoption of a supplemental brain-death standard...This raises the fundamental question of decisionmaking in pluralist democratic societies, of the limits of democratic involvement in such choices, and of the role of bodies like the Danish Council of Ethics...It must be part of the mission of a governmental bioethical body to use its peculiar expertise to teach and to lead -- to build a popular consensus out of confusion. But in doing so, such a Commission will be steering a dangerous course....

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-252
Number of pages16
JournalBioethics
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Democracy
Brain Death
public choice
Ethics
brain
democracy
death
moral philosophy
public education
Education
Brain
expertise
Population
society
Ethical Choice
Surveys and Questionnaires
Confusion
Public Education
Decision Making
Expertise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Cushman, R., & Holm, S. (1990). Death, democracy and public ethical choice. Bioethics, 4(3), 237-252.

Death, democracy and public ethical choice. / Cushman, Reid; Holm, Soren.

In: Bioethics, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.07.1990, p. 237-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cushman, R & Holm, S 1990, 'Death, democracy and public ethical choice.', Bioethics, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 237-252.
Cushman R, Holm S. Death, democracy and public ethical choice. Bioethics. 1990 Jul 1;4(3):237-252.
Cushman, Reid ; Holm, Soren. / Death, democracy and public ethical choice. In: Bioethics. 1990 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 237-252.
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