De novo reconstitution of a functional mammalian urinary bladder by tissue engineering

Frank Oberpenning, Jun Meng, James J. Yoo, Anthony Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

626 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human organ replacement is limited by a donor shortage, problems with tissue compatibility, and rejection. Creation of an organ with autologous tissue would be advantageous. In this study, transplantable urinary bladder neo-organs were reproducibly created in vitro from urothelial and smooth muscle cells grown in culture from canine native bladder biopsies and seeded onto preformed bladder-shaped polymers. The native bladders were subsequently excised from canine donors and replaced with the tissue-engineered neo- organs. In functional evaluations for up to 11 months, the bladder neo- organs demonstrated a normal capacity to retain urine, normal elastic properties, and histologic architecture. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that successful reconstitution of an autonomous hollow organ is possible using tissue-engineering methods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalNature Biotechnology
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tissue Engineering
Tissue engineering
Urinary Bladder
Tissue
Biopsy
Canidae
Cell culture
Muscle
Polymers
Cells
Histocompatibility
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Urine

Keywords

  • Augmentation
  • Cell culture
  • Cystectomy
  • Cystoplasty
  • Neo-bladder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

De novo reconstitution of a functional mammalian urinary bladder by tissue engineering. / Oberpenning, Frank; Meng, Jun; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony.

In: Nature Biotechnology, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.02.1999, p. 149-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oberpenning, Frank ; Meng, Jun ; Yoo, James J. ; Atala, Anthony. / De novo reconstitution of a functional mammalian urinary bladder by tissue engineering. In: Nature Biotechnology. 1999 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 149-155.
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