Daily target localization for prostate patients based on 3D image correlation

K. Paskalev, C. M. Ma, R. Jacob, R. Price, S. McNeeley, L. Wang, B. Movsas, Alan Pollack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are several localization techniques that have been used for prostate treatment. Recently, the potential use of a variety of CT-based equipment in the treatment room has been discussed. The goal of our study was to develop an automated procedure for daily treatment table shift calculation based on two CT data sets: simulation CT data and localization CT data. The method suggested in this study is a 3D image cross-correlation of small regions of interest (ROI) within the two data sets. The relative position of the two ROIs with respect to each other is determined by the maximum value of the normalized cross-correlation function, calculated for all possible relative locations of the two ROIs. After the best match is found the shifts are given by the vector connecting the treatment isocentre and the planning isocentre (both determined by the radio opaque fiducial markers on the patient's skin). The results have been compared with shifts calculated through manual fusion. The shift differences, averaged over 17 statistically independent shift calculations, are less then 1 mm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, and about 1 mm in the AP direction. The impact of image noise on the performance of the algorithm has been tested. The results show that the algorithm accurately adjusts for target positional changes even with Gaussian noise levels as high as 20% inserted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)931-939
Number of pages9
JournalPhysics in Medicine and Biology
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 21 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostate
shift
Skin
Fusion reactions
cross correlation
Fiducial Markers
Planning
Therapeutics
random noise
markers
rooms
planning
Equipment and Supplies
fusion
simulation
Direction compound
Datasets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Daily target localization for prostate patients based on 3D image correlation. / Paskalev, K.; Ma, C. M.; Jacob, R.; Price, R.; McNeeley, S.; Wang, L.; Movsas, B.; Pollack, Alan.

In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 49, No. 6, 21.03.2004, p. 931-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paskalev, K, Ma, CM, Jacob, R, Price, R, McNeeley, S, Wang, L, Movsas, B & Pollack, A 2004, 'Daily target localization for prostate patients based on 3D image correlation', Physics in Medicine and Biology, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 931-939. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/49/6/005
Paskalev, K. ; Ma, C. M. ; Jacob, R. ; Price, R. ; McNeeley, S. ; Wang, L. ; Movsas, B. ; Pollack, Alan. / Daily target localization for prostate patients based on 3D image correlation. In: Physics in Medicine and Biology. 2004 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 931-939.
@article{f1b56750e9404430888953e8618819d4,
title = "Daily target localization for prostate patients based on 3D image correlation",
abstract = "There are several localization techniques that have been used for prostate treatment. Recently, the potential use of a variety of CT-based equipment in the treatment room has been discussed. The goal of our study was to develop an automated procedure for daily treatment table shift calculation based on two CT data sets: simulation CT data and localization CT data. The method suggested in this study is a 3D image cross-correlation of small regions of interest (ROI) within the two data sets. The relative position of the two ROIs with respect to each other is determined by the maximum value of the normalized cross-correlation function, calculated for all possible relative locations of the two ROIs. After the best match is found the shifts are given by the vector connecting the treatment isocentre and the planning isocentre (both determined by the radio opaque fiducial markers on the patient's skin). The results have been compared with shifts calculated through manual fusion. The shift differences, averaged over 17 statistically independent shift calculations, are less then 1 mm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, and about 1 mm in the AP direction. The impact of image noise on the performance of the algorithm has been tested. The results show that the algorithm accurately adjusts for target positional changes even with Gaussian noise levels as high as 20{\%} inserted.",
author = "K. Paskalev and Ma, {C. M.} and R. Jacob and R. Price and S. McNeeley and L. Wang and B. Movsas and Alan Pollack",
year = "2004",
month = "3",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1088/0031-9155/49/6/005",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "931--939",
journal = "Physics in Medicine and Biology",
issn = "0031-9155",
publisher = "IOP Publishing Ltd.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Daily target localization for prostate patients based on 3D image correlation

AU - Paskalev, K.

AU - Ma, C. M.

AU - Jacob, R.

AU - Price, R.

AU - McNeeley, S.

AU - Wang, L.

AU - Movsas, B.

AU - Pollack, Alan

PY - 2004/3/21

Y1 - 2004/3/21

N2 - There are several localization techniques that have been used for prostate treatment. Recently, the potential use of a variety of CT-based equipment in the treatment room has been discussed. The goal of our study was to develop an automated procedure for daily treatment table shift calculation based on two CT data sets: simulation CT data and localization CT data. The method suggested in this study is a 3D image cross-correlation of small regions of interest (ROI) within the two data sets. The relative position of the two ROIs with respect to each other is determined by the maximum value of the normalized cross-correlation function, calculated for all possible relative locations of the two ROIs. After the best match is found the shifts are given by the vector connecting the treatment isocentre and the planning isocentre (both determined by the radio opaque fiducial markers on the patient's skin). The results have been compared with shifts calculated through manual fusion. The shift differences, averaged over 17 statistically independent shift calculations, are less then 1 mm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, and about 1 mm in the AP direction. The impact of image noise on the performance of the algorithm has been tested. The results show that the algorithm accurately adjusts for target positional changes even with Gaussian noise levels as high as 20% inserted.

AB - There are several localization techniques that have been used for prostate treatment. Recently, the potential use of a variety of CT-based equipment in the treatment room has been discussed. The goal of our study was to develop an automated procedure for daily treatment table shift calculation based on two CT data sets: simulation CT data and localization CT data. The method suggested in this study is a 3D image cross-correlation of small regions of interest (ROI) within the two data sets. The relative position of the two ROIs with respect to each other is determined by the maximum value of the normalized cross-correlation function, calculated for all possible relative locations of the two ROIs. After the best match is found the shifts are given by the vector connecting the treatment isocentre and the planning isocentre (both determined by the radio opaque fiducial markers on the patient's skin). The results have been compared with shifts calculated through manual fusion. The shift differences, averaged over 17 statistically independent shift calculations, are less then 1 mm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, and about 1 mm in the AP direction. The impact of image noise on the performance of the algorithm has been tested. The results show that the algorithm accurately adjusts for target positional changes even with Gaussian noise levels as high as 20% inserted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1642528349&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1642528349&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1088/0031-9155/49/6/005

DO - 10.1088/0031-9155/49/6/005

M3 - Article

C2 - 15104317

AN - SCOPUS:1642528349

VL - 49

SP - 931

EP - 939

JO - Physics in Medicine and Biology

JF - Physics in Medicine and Biology

SN - 0031-9155

IS - 6

ER -