Daily Microaggressions and Related Distress among Black Women Living with HIV during the Onset of the COVID-19 Pandemic and Black Lives Matter Protests

Sannisha K. Dale, Yue Pan, Nadine Gardner, Sherence Saunders, Ian A. Wright, Cheri M. Nelson, Jingxin Liu, Arnetta Phillips, Gail H. Ironson, Allan E. Rodriguez, Maria L. Alcaide, Steven A. Safren, Daniel J. Feaster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Black women living with HIV (BWLWH) in the U.S. face microaggressions based on race, gender, HIV-status, and sexual orientation. We examined changes in daily microaggressions and related distress among 143 BWLWH in Miami, FL. Microaggression-related distress increased from 52% at baseline/October, peaked at 70% during the holidays (November/December), declined to 55% in March when COVID-19 social distancing began, and peaked to 83% in June/July 2020 during widespread Black Lives Matters protests. Baseline viral suppression was associated with lower microaggressions across the 9-months. Microaggression-related distress may change due to social context and research is needed on microaggressions and viral load overtime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Black lives matter
  • Black women living with HIV
  • COVID-19
  • Microaggression
  • Viral suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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