Cyanobacterial blooms and the occurrence of the neurotoxin, beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), in South Florida aquatic food webs

Larry E Brand, John Pablo, Angela Compton, Neil Hammerschlag, Deborah C Mash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

151 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies demonstrate that most cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-. l-alanine (BMAA) and that it can biomagnify in at least one terrestrial food chain. BMAA has been implicated as a significant environmental risk in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We examined several blooms of cyanobacteria in South Florida, and the BMAA content of resident animals, including species used as human food. A wide range of BMAA concentrations were found, ranging from below assay detection limits to approximately 7000μg/g, a concentration associated with a potential long-term human health hazard.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)620-635
Number of pages16
JournalHarmful Algae
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Fingerprint

aquatic food webs
neurotoxins
alanine
food web
algal bloom
cyanobacterium
Cyanobacteria
environmental risk
food chain
health hazards
Parkinson disease
neurodegenerative diseases
Alzheimer disease
assay
human health
detection limit
foods
food
assays
animals

Keywords

  • BMAA
  • Cyanobacteria
  • Florida
  • Harmful algal blooms
  • Neurodegenerative disease
  • Toxin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Cyanobacterial blooms and the occurrence of the neurotoxin, beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), in South Florida aquatic food webs. / Brand, Larry E; Pablo, John; Compton, Angela; Hammerschlag, Neil; Mash, Deborah C.

In: Harmful Algae, Vol. 9, No. 6, 01.09.2010, p. 620-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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