Cyanobacterial blooms and the occurrence of the neurotoxin, beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), in South Florida aquatic food webs

Larry E. Brand, John Pablo, Angela Compton, Neil Hammerschlag, Deborah C. Mash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

168 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies demonstrate that most cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-. l-alanine (BMAA) and that it can biomagnify in at least one terrestrial food chain. BMAA has been implicated as a significant environmental risk in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We examined several blooms of cyanobacteria in South Florida, and the BMAA content of resident animals, including species used as human food. A wide range of BMAA concentrations were found, ranging from below assay detection limits to approximately 7000μg/g, a concentration associated with a potential long-term human health hazard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)620-635
Number of pages16
JournalHarmful Algae
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Keywords

  • BMAA
  • Cyanobacteria
  • Florida
  • Harmful algal blooms
  • Neurodegenerative disease
  • Toxin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Plant Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cyanobacterial blooms and the occurrence of the neurotoxin, beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), in South Florida aquatic food webs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this