Current status and recommendations for the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology: Report of the american society for radiation oncology cancer biology/radiation biology task force, executive summary

Paul E. Wallner, Mitchell S. Anscher, Christopher A. Barker, Michael Bassetti, Robert G. Bristow, Yong I. Cha, Adam P. Dicker, Silvia C. Formenti, Edward E. Graves, Stephen M. Hahn, Tom K. Hei, Alec C. Kimmelman, David G. Kirsch, Kevin R. Kozak, Theodore S. Lawrence, Brian Marples, William H. McBride, Ross B. Mikkelsen, Catherine C. Park, Joanne B. WeidhaasAnthony L. Zietman, Michael Steinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-17
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

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    Wallner, P. E., Anscher, M. S., Barker, C. A., Bassetti, M., Bristow, R. G., Cha, Y. I., Dicker, A. P., Formenti, S. C., Graves, E. E., Hahn, S. M., Hei, T. K., Kimmelman, A. C., Kirsch, D. G., Kozak, K. R., Lawrence, T. S., Marples, B., McBride, W. H., Mikkelsen, R. B., Park, C. C., ... Steinberg, M. (2014). Current status and recommendations for the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology: Report of the american society for radiation oncology cancer biology/radiation biology task force, executive summary. International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 88(1), 11-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2013.09.040