Culturally Adapted Psychosocial Interventions for Schizophrenia: A Review

Jessica Maura, Amy G Weisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent research examining the potential efficacy of culturally adapted interventions for various mental disorders illustrates increasing interest in the integration of cultural perspectives into mental health systems. Despite recent evidence demonstrating that culturally adapted interventions may be more effective than a one-size-fits-all approach, few psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia consider cultural factors that may enhance their efficacy with diverse populations. The aim of this review is to discuss the empirical evidence examining the potential utility of culturally adapted group interventions for schizophrenia, as a means to encourage further work and expansion in this area. Specifically, this article provides an in-depth review of the empirical literature on culturally adapted psychosocial interventions for individuals with schizophrenia and their family members, with a focus on group-based interventions. This review is followed by a discussion of a few cultural constructs that may impact patient and family member functioning, and therefore may be important to address in psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia. Finally, we end this review with a broad discussion of research limitations and potential areas for additional research, clinical implications for adapting EBTs to better address cultural concerns, and a case vignette to illustrate how cultural considerations can be integrated into a traditional multifamily group therapy approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 5 2016

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Group
  • Intervention
  • Schizophrenia
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this