Cultural transitions in first-generation immigrants acculturation of soviet jewish refugee adolescents and parents

Dina Birman, Edison J. Trickett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

193 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article focuses on the process of acculturation for first-generation Soviet Jewish refugee adolescents and their parents who have resettled in the United States. First, the extent of acculturation to the new and the old culture is assessed independently. Second, acculturation is assessed multidimensionally, including the constructs of language competence, behavioral acculturation, and cultural identity. Third, the extent to which life stage differences at immigration affect the acculturation process is assessed. Overall, the data suggest that acculturation appears to occur in a linear pattern over time for most dimensions of acculturation, with acculturation to the American culture increasing and acculturation to the Russian culture decreasing. However, Russian language competence for the parents did not diminish with length of residence in the country. Furthermore, an unexpected acculturative gap was observed between parents and children with respect to Russian identity, with adolescents being more identified with the Russian culture than their parents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-477
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cultural transitions in first-generation immigrants acculturation of soviet jewish refugee adolescents and parents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this