CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone concentrations differ in patients with schizoaffective disorder from patients with schizophrenia or mood disorders

Rajiv P. Sharma, Brian Martis, Cherise Rosen, Janardhana Jonalagadda, Charles Nemeroff, Garth Bissette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if there were differences in CSF-TRH concentrations among several acute major psychiatric disorders and to investigate the effects of antipsychotic treatment on CSF-TRH levels. Method: CSF-TRH concentrations were measured in 62 psychiatric inpatients during an acute phase of illness after a drug-free period. CSF-TRH measurements were repeated in 14 of these patients after 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Results: Post-hoc tests (Tukey HSD) revealed significant differences among patients with schizoaffective disorder and both schizophrenia (P<0.03) and major depression (P<0.01). There were no significant differences between pre and posttreatment levels of CSF-TRH in the 14 patients treated with conventional agents for 4 weeks (1.54 pg/ml vs. 1.47 pg/ml). However, patients with a reduction in CSF-TRH concentration had a significantly better symptom response measured by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) positive factor (61% in six subjects) vs. those who had an increase in posttreatment CSF-TRH (29% in eight subjects; t=2.2; d.f.=12; P<0.04). Conclusions: These results provide further evidence for a neuromodulatory role for TRH and suggest a re-examination of its behavioral effects and interactions with brain neurotransmitter systems relevant to major psychotic and mood disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-291
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 16 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone
Mood Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia
Antipsychotic Agents
Psychiatry
Psychotic Affective Disorders
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
Neurotransmitter Agents
Inpatients
Depression
Brain
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Antipsychotic treatment
  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Mood disorders
  • Schizoaffective disorder
  • Schizophrenia
  • Thyrotropin-releasing hormone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone concentrations differ in patients with schizoaffective disorder from patients with schizophrenia or mood disorders. / Sharma, Rajiv P.; Martis, Brian; Rosen, Cherise; Jonalagadda, Janardhana; Nemeroff, Charles; Bissette, Garth.

In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, Vol. 35, No. 5, 16.10.2001, p. 287-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, Rajiv P. ; Martis, Brian ; Rosen, Cherise ; Jonalagadda, Janardhana ; Nemeroff, Charles ; Bissette, Garth. / CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone concentrations differ in patients with schizoaffective disorder from patients with schizophrenia or mood disorders. In: Journal of Psychiatric Research. 2001 ; Vol. 35, No. 5. pp. 287-291.
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