Crystal-induced endogenous pyrogen production. A further look at gouty inflammation

S. E. Malawista, G. W. Duff, E. Atkins, Herman S Cheung, D. J. McCarty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We found previously that crystals of sodium urate and silicon dioxide (silica) can stimulate the production of endogenous pyrogen (EP), now called interleukin-1 (IL-1), the polypeptide mediator of fever and other aspects of inflammation. We have confirmed and extended the work with urate crystals and have examined 2 other crystals associated with joint problems, hydroxyapatite (HA) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The crystals were added to suspensions of human blood leukocytes (2.5 x 106 monocytes/dose, with 10% fresh autologous plasma); after 18 hours of incubation, the EP content of the supernatants was assayed in the rabbit pyrogen test. HA and CPPD crystals neither induced EP production nor reduced the amount of staphylococci-induced EP. Presized (10-40 μm) urate crystals were pyrogenic, but less so than the unsized and aggregated urate crystals investigated previously and reexamined here. On ultrasonication, the aggregated urate crystals became first more pyrogenic and then less so as the crystals were dispersed and broken down. Ultrasound did not impart pyrogenicity to HA or CPPD crystals: their failure to stimulate EP/IL-1 production from leukocytes in vitro indicates a difference in their phlogistic properties, compared with crystals of urate or silica. The results with urate crystals have pathogenetic implications in a number of areas of gouty inflammation: initiation of the acute attack, other aspects of the acute-phase response, polyarticular involvement, and the inflammatory consequences of chronic stimulation by tophaceous material.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1039-1046
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Uric Acid
Inflammation
Calcium Pyrophosphate
Durapatite
Silicon Dioxide
Interleukin-1
Leukocytes
Pyrogens
Acute-Phase Reaction
leukocyte endogenous mediator
Staphylococcus
Monocytes
Suspensions
Fever
Joints
Rabbits
Peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Crystal-induced endogenous pyrogen production. A further look at gouty inflammation. / Malawista, S. E.; Duff, G. W.; Atkins, E.; Cheung, Herman S; McCarty, D. J.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 28, No. 9, 20.11.1985, p. 1039-1046.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malawista, S. E. ; Duff, G. W. ; Atkins, E. ; Cheung, Herman S ; McCarty, D. J. / Crystal-induced endogenous pyrogen production. A further look at gouty inflammation. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 1985 ; Vol. 28, No. 9. pp. 1039-1046.
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