Criticai ocean infrastructure needs for the US in the year 2030

Eric J. Barron, Rana A Fine, Oscar Schofield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The National Science and Technology Council's Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology (SOST) has commissioned a National Research Council study to assist in planning the US's ocean research infrastructure needs in the year 2030. Released in April 2011, the report, Infrastructure Strategy for US Ocean Research in 2030 was designed to identify major research questions anticipated to be at the forefront of ocean science in 2030. The report recommends that federal ocean agencies should establish and maintain a coordinated national strategic plan for critical shared ocean infrastructure investment, maintenance and retirement. An examination of trends revealed that, in the past two decades, the use of floats, gliders, ROVs, AUVs and scientific seafloor cables has increased; the use of ships, drifters, moorings and towed platforms has remained stable; and the use of human-occupied vehicles has declined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-21
Number of pages5
JournalSea Technology
Volume52
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gliders
Remotely operated vehicles
Mooring
Ships
Cables
Planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ocean Engineering

Cite this

Criticai ocean infrastructure needs for the US in the year 2030. / Barron, Eric J.; Fine, Rana A; Schofield, Oscar.

In: Sea Technology, Vol. 52, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 17-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barron, EJ, Fine, RA & Schofield, O 2011, 'Criticai ocean infrastructure needs for the US in the year 2030', Sea Technology, vol. 52, no. 8, pp. 17-21.
Barron, Eric J. ; Fine, Rana A ; Schofield, Oscar. / Criticai ocean infrastructure needs for the US in the year 2030. In: Sea Technology. 2011 ; Vol. 52, No. 8. pp. 17-21.
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