Cost-effectiveness analysis of Recovery Management Checkups (RMC) for adults with chronic substance use disorders: Evidence from a 4-year randomized trial

Kathryn McCollister, Michael French, Derek M. Freitas, Michael L. Dennis, Christy K. Scott, Rodney R. Funk

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: This study performs the first cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of Recovery Management Checkups (RMC) for adults with chronic substance use disorders. Design: Cost-effectiveness analysis of a randomized clinical trial of RMC. Participants were assigned randomly to a control condition of outcome monitoring (OM-only) or the experimental condition OM-plus-RMC, with quarterly follow-up for 4 years. Setting: Participants were recruited from the largest central intake unit for substance abuse treatment in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Participants: A total of 446 participants who were 38 years old on average, 54% male, and predominantly African American (85%). Measurements: Data on the quarterly cost per participant come from a previous study of OM and RMC intervention costs. Effectiveness is measured as the number of days of abstinence and number of substance use-related problems. Findings: Over the 4-year trial, OM-plus-RMC cost on average $2184 more than OM-only (P<0.01). Participants in OM-plus-RMC averaged 1026 days abstinent and had 89 substance use-related problems. OM-only averaged 932 days abstinent and reported 126 substance use-related problems. Mean differences for both effectiveness measures were statistically significant (P<0.01). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for OM-plus-RMC was $23.38 per day abstinent and $59.51 per reduced substance-related problem. When additional costs to society were factored into the analysis, OM-plus-RMC was less costly and more effective than OM-only. Conclusions: Recovery Management Checkups are a cost-effective and potentially cost-saving strategy for promoting abstinence and reducing substance use-related problems among chronic substance users.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2166-2174
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction
Volume108
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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Substance-Related Disorders
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
African Americans
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • Chronic substance use disorder
  • Cost-effectiveness analysis
  • Economic evaluation
  • Recovery Management Checkups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cost-effectiveness analysis of Recovery Management Checkups (RMC) for adults with chronic substance use disorders : Evidence from a 4-year randomized trial. / McCollister, Kathryn; French, Michael; Freitas, Derek M.; Dennis, Michael L.; Scott, Christy K.; Funk, Rodney R.

In: Addiction, Vol. 108, No. 12, 01.12.2013, p. 2166-2174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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