Cost and policy implications from the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), among children and adults, has posed important policy and budgetary considerations to government, health insurance companies, employers, physicians, and health care delivery systems. Objective: This article examines issues that are common to obesity and DM, including cost, clinical research, and treatment barriers, and proposes health policies to address these issues. Method: A manual review was performed of authoritative literature from peer-reviewed medical publications and recently published medical textbooks. Results: Obesity has been disproportionately prevalent among women and minorities, accompanied by an increased risk for DM. Women have experienced an increased risk for the metabolic syndrome, DM, and cardiovascular disease after onset of menopause. Obesity has been related to an increased risk for breast cancer among women, and may be a barrier that prevents women from being screened for colon and breast cancers. Maternal obesity has been a risk factor for gestational DM. Conclusions: Obesity and DM represent crises for the health care system and the health of the public, incurring costs and disease burden for adults and children, with increasing costs and prevalence expected unless more coordinated efforts to address the causes of these conditions at the national level are implemented. An investment in infrastructure to promote increased physical activity and reward weight management may be budget neutral in the long term by reducing the costs of morbidity and mortality. About two thirds of the costs from DM complications could be averted with appropriate primary care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-108
Number of pages23
JournalGender Medicine
Volume6
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2009

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chronic illness
Diabetes Mellitus
Obesity
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
Delivery of Health Care
Occupational Health Physicians
Breast Neoplasms
cancer
Cost of Illness
Gestational Diabetes
Textbooks
Disease
health care delivery system
menopause
Budgets
Diabetes Complications
Health Insurance
Menopause
Health Policy

Keywords

  • behavior change
  • diabetes mellitus
  • health policy
  • metabolic syndrome
  • obesity
  • women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Cost and policy implications from the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus. / Ryan, John.

In: Gender Medicine, Vol. 6, No. SUPPL. 1, 26.03.2009, p. 86-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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