Correlation between low natural killing of fibroblasts infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 and susceptibility to herpesvirus infections

C. Lopez, D. Kirkpatrick, S. E. Read, P. A. Fitzgerald, J. Pitt, Savita G Pahwa, C. Y. Ching, E. M. Smithwick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Natural killer cells capable of lysing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected fibroblasts were studied in three groups of patients unusually susceptible to severe herpesvirus infections. Cord blood was evaluated because of the known susceptibility of neonates to disseminated infections due to herpes simplex virus type 2 at birth. Only 30% of the cord blood specimens tested demonstrated normal lysis of HSV-1-infected fibroblasts and a normal increment in the lysis of infected over uninfected cells. Five out of six patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) also were found to have abnormally low responses by these criteria. The one WAS patient with normal responses had had little difficulty with infections and had survived much longer than usual. Five patients with severe herpesvirus infections and no known primary cellular immunodeficiency had natural killer cell function significantly below normal (P < 0.001). These data suggest that natural killer cells probably play an important role in human resistance to herpesvirus infection and that deficiencies of this system may result in unusual susceptibility to herpesvirus infections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1030-1035
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume147
Issue number6
StatePublished - Aug 25 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Herpesviridae Infections
Human Herpesvirus 1
Fibroblasts
Natural Killer Cells
Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome
Fetal Blood
Human Herpesvirus 2
Infection
Parturition
Newborn Infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Correlation between low natural killing of fibroblasts infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 and susceptibility to herpesvirus infections. / Lopez, C.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Read, S. E.; Fitzgerald, P. A.; Pitt, J.; Pahwa, Savita G; Ching, C. Y.; Smithwick, E. M.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 147, No. 6, 25.08.1983, p. 1030-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lopez, C, Kirkpatrick, D, Read, SE, Fitzgerald, PA, Pitt, J, Pahwa, SG, Ching, CY & Smithwick, EM 1983, 'Correlation between low natural killing of fibroblasts infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 and susceptibility to herpesvirus infections', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 147, no. 6, pp. 1030-1035.
Lopez, C. ; Kirkpatrick, D. ; Read, S. E. ; Fitzgerald, P. A. ; Pitt, J. ; Pahwa, Savita G ; Ching, C. Y. ; Smithwick, E. M. / Correlation between low natural killing of fibroblasts infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 and susceptibility to herpesvirus infections. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1983 ; Vol. 147, No. 6. pp. 1030-1035.
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