Coprolalia and other coprophenomena

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30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coprolalia has been a recognized symptom of Tourette syndrome from the first description of the syndrome. Copropraxia is seen less frequently and almost always occurs in association with coprolalia. Prevalence of coprolalia varies from 8% in primary pediatric practices to over 60% in tertiary referral centers. Coprolalia tends to peak in severity during adolescence and to wane during adulthood. The pathogenesis may be related to dysfunction of basal ganglionic and limbic mini-circuits. Coprolalia has also been seen in a variety of other neurologic disorders. Treatment is primarily pharmacologic with dopamine-blocking agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-308
Number of pages10
JournalNeurologic Clinics
Volume15
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Tourette Syndrome
Dopamine Agents
Nervous System Diseases
Tertiary Care Centers
Pediatrics
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Coprolalia and other coprophenomena. / Singer, Carlos.

In: Neurologic Clinics, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.01.1997, p. 299-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singer, Carlos. / Coprolalia and other coprophenomena. In: Neurologic Clinics. 1997 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 299-308.
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