Coping Self-Efficacy Buffers Psychological and Physiological Disturbances in HIV-Infected Men Following a Natural Disaster

Charles C. Benight, Michael H. Antoni, Kristin Kilbourn, Gail Ironson, Mahendra A. Kumar, Mary Ann Fletcher, Laura Redwine, Andrew Baum, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

The importance of coping self-efficacy (CSE) appraisals on psychological and physiological functioning for HIV seropositive patients facing a severe environmental stressor was tested comparing 37 HIV-infected gay men and 42 healthy male control participants following Hurricane Andrew. Results suggested that greater levels of CSE were related to lower emotional distress and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in both groups. In addition, greater CSE was associated with lower norepinephrine to cortisol ratios in the HIV group but not in the healthy control group. Results are discussed in relation to the coping process for HIV-infected individuals specifically and chronically ill populations in general who face severe environmental stressors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-255
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1997
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Disaster
  • HIV-AIDS
  • Self-efficacy
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

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