Cooperative party factions in American politics

John G Koger, Seth Masket, Hans Noel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What are the primary factions within the Democratic and Republican parties, and to what extent do rival factions cooperate? We address these questions using a unique data set of information sharing between party organizations, media outlets, 527s, and interest groups. Using social network methods, we identify two major information-sharing clusters, or expanded party networks; these networks correspond to a liberal/Democratic grouping and a conservative/Republican grouping. We further identify factions within each party network, but we find a high degree of cooperation between party factions. That is, our data suggest that beneath the intraparty disagreements we observe in primary elections and policy debates there is a subterranean pattern of organizational cooperation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-53
Number of pages21
JournalAmerican Politics Research
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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faction
politics
grouping
Republican Party
party organization
interest group
social network
election

Keywords

  • 527 organizations
  • Interest groups
  • Party polarization
  • Political networks
  • Political parties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Cooperative party factions in American politics. / Koger, John G; Masket, Seth; Noel, Hans.

In: American Politics Research, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 33-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koger, John G ; Masket, Seth ; Noel, Hans. / Cooperative party factions in American politics. In: American Politics Research. 2010 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 33-53.
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