Controls of hair follicle cycling

K. S. Stenn, Ralf Paus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

930 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nearly 50 years ago, Chase published a review of hair cycling in which he detailed hair growth in the mouse and integrated hair biology with the biology of his day. In this review we have used Chase as our model and tried to put the adult hair follicle growth cycle in perspective. We have tried to sketch the adult hair follicle cycle, as we know it today and what needs to be known. Above all, we hope that this work will serve as an introduction to basic biologists who are looking for a defined biological system that illustrates many of the challenges of modern biology: cell differentiation, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, stem cell biology, pattern formation, apoptosis, cell and organ growth cycles, and pigmentation. The most important theme in studying the cycling hair follicle is that the follicle is a regenerating system. By traversing the phases of the cycle (growth, regression, resting, shedding, then growth again), the follicle demonstrates the unusual ability to completely regenerate itself. The basis for this regeneration rests in the unique follicular epithelial and mesenchymal components and their interactions. Recently, some of the molecular signals making up these interactions have been defined. They involve gene families also found in other regenerating systems such as fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, Wnt pathway, Sonic hedgehog, neurotrophins, and homeobox. For the immediate future, our challenge is to define the molecular basis for hair follicle growth control, to regenerate a mature hair follicle in vitro from defined populations, and to offer real solutions to our patients' problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-494
Number of pages46
JournalPhysiological Reviews
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hair Follicle
Growth
Hair
Wnt Signaling Pathway
Hedgehogs
Fibroblast Growth Factors
Homeobox Genes
Nerve Growth Factors
Pigmentation
Transforming Growth Factors
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Cell Biology
Regeneration
Cell Differentiation
Apoptosis
Population
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Controls of hair follicle cycling. / Stenn, K. S.; Paus, Ralf.

In: Physiological Reviews, Vol. 81, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 449-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Stenn, K. S. ; Paus, Ralf. / Controls of hair follicle cycling. In: Physiological Reviews. 2001 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 449-494.
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