Controlled ventilation enhances catheter stability during radiofrequency ablation

Franah Vazir-Marino, Ming Lon Young, Vikas Kohli, Michael Barron, Grace S. Wolff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Variations in the amplitude of the atrial and ventricular depolarization waves of the intracardiac electrogram occur during different phases of respiration. Therefore, we tested whether controlled ventilation would reduce ablation attempts and increase the rate of success in patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation with general anesthesia. Thirty-eight children were divided into two groups: (1) controlled and (2) noncontrolled or cyclic ventilation. In the controlled ventilation group, the mapping electrogram was recorded during sustained inspiration, sustained expiration, and cyclic ventilation. Ablation was done in the phase of ventilation that had the least variability in atrial and ventricular amplitudes. Seventeen patients in the controlled ventilation group had tracings adequate for review. In eight patients, ablation was done during sustained inspiration with the percentage change of atrial and ventricular amplitudes (15% ± 16% and 13% ± 16%, respectively) being < that during sustained expiration (38% ± 27%, P = 0.04 and 20% ± 21%) or during cyclic ventilation (57% ± 27%, P < 0.01 and 54% ± 26%, P = 0.003). In nine patients, ablation was done during sustained expiration with the percentage change of atrial and ventricular amplitudes (5% ± 5% and 5% ± 2%) being less than that during sustained inspiration (21% ± 14%, P = 0.01 and 11% + 6%, P = 0.01) or during cyclic ventilation (68% ± 23%, P < 0.001 and 48 ± 26%, P = 0.001). We achieved success with each patient in both groups, but the number of ablation attempts were less in the controlled ventilation group 1 (3 ± 2), as compared to the cyclic ventilation group 2 (8 ± 8; P < 0.02). We concluded that controlled ventilation reduced the number of ablation attempts and facilitated the ablation procedure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-90
Number of pages5
JournalPACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology
Volume22
Issue number1 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 11 1999

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Ventilation
Catheters
Cardiac Electrophysiologic Techniques
General Anesthesia
Respiration

Keywords

  • Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia
  • Electrophysiologic study
  • Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Controlled ventilation enhances catheter stability during radiofrequency ablation. / Vazir-Marino, Franah; Young, Ming Lon; Kohli, Vikas; Barron, Michael; Wolff, Grace S.

In: PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology, Vol. 22, No. 1 I, 11.02.1999, p. 86-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vazir-Marino, Franah ; Young, Ming Lon ; Kohli, Vikas ; Barron, Michael ; Wolff, Grace S. / Controlled ventilation enhances catheter stability during radiofrequency ablation. In: PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology. 1999 ; Vol. 22, No. 1 I. pp. 86-90.
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