Contribution of Behavior Therapy to Dietary Treatment in Cystic Fibrosis: A Randomized Controlled Study with 2-Year Follow-up

Lori J. Stark, Lisa C. Opipari, Leslie E. Spieth, Elissa Jelalian, Alexandra Quittner, Laurie Higgins, Laura Mackner, Kelly Byars, Allan Lapey, Virginia A. Stallings, Christopher Duggan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Behavioral intervention (BI) was compared to nutrition education (NE) to better understand the contribution of behavior therapy to nutrition management in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Participants were 7 children between 6 and 12 years of age with weight for age percentiles ranging from the 3rd to the 27th. Families in each condition were seen for 7 sessions and provided the same nutrition information and calorie goals. The BI received training on child behavior management. Caloric intake across meals was evaluated via multiple baseline design. Results indicated that the BI had a greater increase in daily caloric intake (1,036 cal/day) and weight gain (1.42 kg) than the NE (408 cal/day, 0.78 kg). Improved caloric intake was maintained 2 years following treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-258
Number of pages22
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Behavior Therapy
Energy Intake
Cystic Fibrosis
Education
Child Behavior
Weight Gain
Meals
Therapeutics
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Stark, L. J., Opipari, L. C., Spieth, L. E., Jelalian, E., Quittner, A., Higgins, L., ... Duggan, C. (2003). Contribution of Behavior Therapy to Dietary Treatment in Cystic Fibrosis: A Randomized Controlled Study with 2-Year Follow-up. Behavior Therapy, 34(2), 237-258. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0005-7894(03)80015-1

Contribution of Behavior Therapy to Dietary Treatment in Cystic Fibrosis : A Randomized Controlled Study with 2-Year Follow-up. / Stark, Lori J.; Opipari, Lisa C.; Spieth, Leslie E.; Jelalian, Elissa; Quittner, Alexandra; Higgins, Laurie; Mackner, Laura; Byars, Kelly; Lapey, Allan; Stallings, Virginia A.; Duggan, Christopher.

In: Behavior Therapy, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.03.2003, p. 237-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stark, LJ, Opipari, LC, Spieth, LE, Jelalian, E, Quittner, A, Higgins, L, Mackner, L, Byars, K, Lapey, A, Stallings, VA & Duggan, C 2003, 'Contribution of Behavior Therapy to Dietary Treatment in Cystic Fibrosis: A Randomized Controlled Study with 2-Year Follow-up', Behavior Therapy, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 237-258. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0005-7894(03)80015-1
Stark, Lori J. ; Opipari, Lisa C. ; Spieth, Leslie E. ; Jelalian, Elissa ; Quittner, Alexandra ; Higgins, Laurie ; Mackner, Laura ; Byars, Kelly ; Lapey, Allan ; Stallings, Virginia A. ; Duggan, Christopher. / Contribution of Behavior Therapy to Dietary Treatment in Cystic Fibrosis : A Randomized Controlled Study with 2-Year Follow-up. In: Behavior Therapy. 2003 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 237-258.
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