Contrasting effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and granulocyte CSF treatment on the cycling of blood elements in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia

Daniel G. Wright, Richard F. Kenney, Dagmar H. Oette, Vincent F. LaRussa, Laurence A. Boxer, Harry L. Malech

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment has been shown to increase average neutrophil counts substantially in patients with childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia (or "cyclic hematopoiesis"), but not to eliminate the cyclic oscillations of neutrophil counts or those of other blood elements (monocytes, platelets, eosinophils, and reticulocytes) that are characteristic of this hematopoietic disorder. Indeed, oscillations of neutrophil counts are amplified during G-CSF treatment. We have compared the effects of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) with those of G-CSF in three patients with this disease (2 men and 1 woman, 17, 30, and 32 years of age). These patients were treated with GM-CSF (2.1 μg/kg/day, subcutaneously) for 6 weeks, preceded and followed by 6 to 13 weeks of detailed observation to document changes in the cyclic oscillations of blood neutrophils and other blood elements; two of the patients were subsequently treated with G-CSF (5.0 μg/kg/d, subcutaneously) and observed for comparable periods of time. Unlike G-CSF treatment, which increased average neutrophil counts more than 20-fold, GM-CSF increased neutrophil counts only modestly, from 1.6- to 3.9-fold, although eosinophilia of varying prominence was induced in each patient. However, at the same time, GM-CSF treatment dampened or eliminated the multilineage oscillations of circulating blood elements (neutrophils, monocytes, platelets, and/or reticulocytes) in each of the patients. In contrast, G-CSF treatment of the same patients markedly amplified the oscillations of neutrophil counts and caused the cycling of other blood elements (monocytes in particular) to become more distinct. These findings support the conclusion that the distinctive cycling of blood cell production in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia results from abnormalities in the coordinate regulation of both GM-CSF-responsive, multipotential progenitor cells and G-CSF-responsive, lineage-restricted, neutrophil progenitors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1257-1267
Number of pages11
JournalBlood
Volume84
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 15 1994

Fingerprint

Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Neutrophils
Blood
Macrophages
Granulocytes
Platelets
Monocytes
Therapeutics
Reticulocytes
Blood Platelets
Cyclic neutropenia
Eosinophilia
Eosinophils
Cells
Blood Cells
Stem Cells
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Contrasting effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and granulocyte CSF treatment on the cycling of blood elements in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia. / Wright, Daniel G.; Kenney, Richard F.; Oette, Dagmar H.; LaRussa, Vincent F.; Boxer, Laurence A.; Malech, Harry L.

In: Blood, Vol. 84, No. 4, 15.08.1994, p. 1257-1267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wright, Daniel G. ; Kenney, Richard F. ; Oette, Dagmar H. ; LaRussa, Vincent F. ; Boxer, Laurence A. ; Malech, Harry L. / Contrasting effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and granulocyte CSF treatment on the cycling of blood elements in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia. In: Blood. 1994 ; Vol. 84, No. 4. pp. 1257-1267.
@article{7bf41bdaa92d470bb8d42bf09fb975e0,
title = "Contrasting effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and granulocyte CSF treatment on the cycling of blood elements in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia",
abstract = "Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment has been shown to increase average neutrophil counts substantially in patients with childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia (or {"}cyclic hematopoiesis{"}), but not to eliminate the cyclic oscillations of neutrophil counts or those of other blood elements (monocytes, platelets, eosinophils, and reticulocytes) that are characteristic of this hematopoietic disorder. Indeed, oscillations of neutrophil counts are amplified during G-CSF treatment. We have compared the effects of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) with those of G-CSF in three patients with this disease (2 men and 1 woman, 17, 30, and 32 years of age). These patients were treated with GM-CSF (2.1 μg/kg/day, subcutaneously) for 6 weeks, preceded and followed by 6 to 13 weeks of detailed observation to document changes in the cyclic oscillations of blood neutrophils and other blood elements; two of the patients were subsequently treated with G-CSF (5.0 μg/kg/d, subcutaneously) and observed for comparable periods of time. Unlike G-CSF treatment, which increased average neutrophil counts more than 20-fold, GM-CSF increased neutrophil counts only modestly, from 1.6- to 3.9-fold, although eosinophilia of varying prominence was induced in each patient. However, at the same time, GM-CSF treatment dampened or eliminated the multilineage oscillations of circulating blood elements (neutrophils, monocytes, platelets, and/or reticulocytes) in each of the patients. In contrast, G-CSF treatment of the same patients markedly amplified the oscillations of neutrophil counts and caused the cycling of other blood elements (monocytes in particular) to become more distinct. These findings support the conclusion that the distinctive cycling of blood cell production in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia results from abnormalities in the coordinate regulation of both GM-CSF-responsive, multipotential progenitor cells and G-CSF-responsive, lineage-restricted, neutrophil progenitors.",
author = "Wright, {Daniel G.} and Kenney, {Richard F.} and Oette, {Dagmar H.} and LaRussa, {Vincent F.} and Boxer, {Laurence A.} and Malech, {Harry L.}",
year = "1994",
month = "8",
day = "15",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "1257--1267",
journal = "Blood",
issn = "0006-4971",
publisher = "American Society of Hematology",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contrasting effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and granulocyte CSF treatment on the cycling of blood elements in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia

AU - Wright, Daniel G.

AU - Kenney, Richard F.

AU - Oette, Dagmar H.

AU - LaRussa, Vincent F.

AU - Boxer, Laurence A.

AU - Malech, Harry L.

PY - 1994/8/15

Y1 - 1994/8/15

N2 - Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment has been shown to increase average neutrophil counts substantially in patients with childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia (or "cyclic hematopoiesis"), but not to eliminate the cyclic oscillations of neutrophil counts or those of other blood elements (monocytes, platelets, eosinophils, and reticulocytes) that are characteristic of this hematopoietic disorder. Indeed, oscillations of neutrophil counts are amplified during G-CSF treatment. We have compared the effects of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) with those of G-CSF in three patients with this disease (2 men and 1 woman, 17, 30, and 32 years of age). These patients were treated with GM-CSF (2.1 μg/kg/day, subcutaneously) for 6 weeks, preceded and followed by 6 to 13 weeks of detailed observation to document changes in the cyclic oscillations of blood neutrophils and other blood elements; two of the patients were subsequently treated with G-CSF (5.0 μg/kg/d, subcutaneously) and observed for comparable periods of time. Unlike G-CSF treatment, which increased average neutrophil counts more than 20-fold, GM-CSF increased neutrophil counts only modestly, from 1.6- to 3.9-fold, although eosinophilia of varying prominence was induced in each patient. However, at the same time, GM-CSF treatment dampened or eliminated the multilineage oscillations of circulating blood elements (neutrophils, monocytes, platelets, and/or reticulocytes) in each of the patients. In contrast, G-CSF treatment of the same patients markedly amplified the oscillations of neutrophil counts and caused the cycling of other blood elements (monocytes in particular) to become more distinct. These findings support the conclusion that the distinctive cycling of blood cell production in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia results from abnormalities in the coordinate regulation of both GM-CSF-responsive, multipotential progenitor cells and G-CSF-responsive, lineage-restricted, neutrophil progenitors.

AB - Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment has been shown to increase average neutrophil counts substantially in patients with childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia (or "cyclic hematopoiesis"), but not to eliminate the cyclic oscillations of neutrophil counts or those of other blood elements (monocytes, platelets, eosinophils, and reticulocytes) that are characteristic of this hematopoietic disorder. Indeed, oscillations of neutrophil counts are amplified during G-CSF treatment. We have compared the effects of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) with those of G-CSF in three patients with this disease (2 men and 1 woman, 17, 30, and 32 years of age). These patients were treated with GM-CSF (2.1 μg/kg/day, subcutaneously) for 6 weeks, preceded and followed by 6 to 13 weeks of detailed observation to document changes in the cyclic oscillations of blood neutrophils and other blood elements; two of the patients were subsequently treated with G-CSF (5.0 μg/kg/d, subcutaneously) and observed for comparable periods of time. Unlike G-CSF treatment, which increased average neutrophil counts more than 20-fold, GM-CSF increased neutrophil counts only modestly, from 1.6- to 3.9-fold, although eosinophilia of varying prominence was induced in each patient. However, at the same time, GM-CSF treatment dampened or eliminated the multilineage oscillations of circulating blood elements (neutrophils, monocytes, platelets, and/or reticulocytes) in each of the patients. In contrast, G-CSF treatment of the same patients markedly amplified the oscillations of neutrophil counts and caused the cycling of other blood elements (monocytes in particular) to become more distinct. These findings support the conclusion that the distinctive cycling of blood cell production in childhood-onset cyclic neutropenia results from abnormalities in the coordinate regulation of both GM-CSF-responsive, multipotential progenitor cells and G-CSF-responsive, lineage-restricted, neutrophil progenitors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028000676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028000676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7519479

AN - SCOPUS:0028000676

VL - 84

SP - 1257

EP - 1267

JO - Blood

JF - Blood

SN - 0006-4971

IS - 4

ER -