Contact-Lens-Associated Purpureocillium Keratitis: Risk Factors, Microbiologic Characteristics, Clinical Course, and Outcomes

Tayyeba K. Ali, Guillermo Amescua, Darlene Miller, Leejee H. Suh, Derek W. Delmonte, Allister Gibbons, Eduardo C Alfonso, Richard Forster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To study the risk factors, microbiologic characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes of patients with Purpureocillium keratitis at a tertiary eye care center in south Florida. Materials and Methods: All medical records during a seven-year period starting January 1, 2007, were reviewed. Twenty-eight culture-proven Purpureocillium keratitis cases with complete medical records presenting to our institution were included in this retrospective, observational case series. Data collected included predisposing factors, therapeutic interventions, treatment duration, and visual outcomes. Results: Twenty patients (71.4%) had a history of soft contact lens use, with only two for therapeutic use. Other identified risk factors were trauma and immunosuppression. Fifteen patients (53.6%) received topical corticosteroid treatment prior to the diagnosis of fungal keratitis. Thirteen patients (46.4%) were on Natamycin treatment prior to Purpureocillium identification. As a group, the average best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at presentation was 1.1 logMAR; upon the final evaluation, it was 1.0 logMAR. The BCVA on last evaluation for the eight patients presenting to our institution within two weeks of onset of symptoms was 0.3 log MAR, and all patients in this group responded to medical management. The final BCVA for 20 patients presenting two weeks after onset of symptoms was 1.2 logMAR. There was a significant difference in the final BCVA between Group 1 and Group 2 (p = 0.004), but no difference in steroid use or previous treatments. Previous steroid use tended to extend time to presentation and was significantly associated with a worse final visual outcome (1.2 versus 0.6 logMAR; p = 0.0474). Previous Natamycin use was significantly associated with a worse final visual outcome (1.4 versus 0.6 logMAR; p = 0.014). Conclusion: Purpureocillium keratitis can have devastating consequences to visual function and even lead to enucleation. Physicians should make every effort to arrive at an earlier microbiological diagnosis, as this is associated with better outcomes and less need for surgical intervention. The first line use of voriconazole is recommended, and steroid use should be avoided, as their previous use is associated with worse visual outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSeminars in Ophthalmology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 24 2015

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial therapy
  • fungal
  • natamycin
  • outbreak
  • Paecilomyces lilacinus
  • voriconazole

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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