Construction Workers Struggle with a High Prevalence of Mental Distress, and This Is Associated with Their Pain and Injuries

Henrik Borsting Jacobsen, Alberto Caban-Martinez, Lynn C. Onyebeke, Glorian Sorensen, Jack T. Dennerlein, Silje Endresen Reme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate how mental distress was associated with pain and injuries in a convenience sample of construction workers. METHODS: A cross-sectional, mental health assessment was conducted in a convenience sample of construction workers (N = 172). A subsample participated in a clinical interview (n = 10). We used a cutoff (1.50 or greater) on Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 to determine substantial mental distress and determined associations with pain and injury outcomes. RESULTS: The prevalence of substantial mental distress was 16% in the workers. This was supported by follow-up clinical interviews where 9 of 10 workers fulfilled the criteria for a mental disorder. Substantial mental distress was associated with both injury rate and self-reported pain. CONCLUSION: This pilot study strongly suggests the need for rigorous studies on construction worker mental health and how it affects their work and well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1197-1204
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume55
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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