Constitutive and instrumental goal orientations and their relations with eudaimonic and hedonic well-being

Blaine Fowers, Christine O. Mollica, Erin N. Procacci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated an Aristotelian model of eudaimonic and hedonic well-being that distinguishes between goal orientations in which the means and ends are separable (instrumental) and in which the means and ends are inherently related (constitutive). Eudaimonic well-being was expected to be related to constitutive goal orientation and hedonic well-being was expected to be related to both constitutive and instrumental goal orientation. Personal identification with activities was expected to mediate the relationship between constitutive goal orientation and eudaimonic well-being. Personal enjoyment was expected to mediate the relationship between instrumental goal orientation and hedonic well-being. Factor analysis supported the independence of constitutive and instrumental goal orientation measures. As predicted, SEM results suggested that there were independent pathways to eudaimonic and hedonic well-being, with strong mediation in both pathways. Results were consistent with Aristotle's [Aristotle (1999). The Nicomachean ethics (M. Ostwald, Trans.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.] concept of eudaimonia and contribute to the growing literature exploring the contrast between eudaimonic and hedonic well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-153
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Positive Psychology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Aristotle
  • Constitutive
  • Eudaimonia
  • Goal pursuit
  • Hedonia
  • Instrumental

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this