Conspiracy theories of quantum mechanics

Peter Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has long been recognized that a local hidden variable theory of quantum mechanics can in principle be constructed, provided one is willing to countenance pre-measurement correlations between the properties of measured systems and measuring devices. However, this 'conspiratorial' approach is typically dismissed out of hand. In this article I examine the justification for dismissing conspiracy theories of quantum mechanics. I consider the existing arguments against such theories, and find them to be less than conclusive. I suggest a more powerful argument against the leading strategy for constructing a conspiracy theory. Finally, I outline two alternative strategies for constructing conspiracy theories, both of which are immune to these arguments, but require one to either modify or reject the common cause principle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-381
Number of pages23
JournalBritish Journal for the Philosophy of Science
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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Quantum Mechanics
Conspiracy Theory
Hidden Variables
Justification
Causes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • History and Philosophy of Science
  • Philosophy

Cite this

Conspiracy theories of quantum mechanics. / Lewis, Peter.

In: British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 57, No. 2, 06.2006, p. 359-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, Peter. / Conspiracy theories of quantum mechanics. In: British Journal for the Philosophy of Science. 2006 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 359-381.
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