Computed tomographic diagnosis of traumatic laryngeal injuries

M. Scaglione, F. Pinto, L. Romano, R. Grassi, A. Pinto, Riccardo Lencioni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fifty-seven consecutive patients with acute laryngeal trauma were referred to our emergency department for evaluation. On the basis of the physical examination findings, 40 (70%) of the patients were excluded from further diagnostic evaluation, 2 (4%) patients with penetrating laryngeal trauma underwent immediate surgery, and 15 (26%) patients with blunt trauma were submitted to laryngoscopy and computed tomography (CT). Findings at CT and laryngoscopy were independently evaluated before classifying patients as having grade 1 or grade 2 lesions: grade I included the presence of minor injuries (mild edema, laryngeal hematomas, or minor laryngeal lacerations); grade 2 included evidence of major injuries (subcutaneous emphysema, mucosal disruption, and/or laryngeal fractures without exposed cartilages). According to the CT findings, 11 of 15 (73%) patients were classified as having grade 1 and 4 of 15 (27%) patients as having grade 2 injuries. At laryngoscopy, owing to local bleeding, findings were nondiagnostic in 2 of 15 (13%) patients (classified as grade 1 at CT); furthermore, 11 of 15 (73%) patients were classified as grade 1 injuries: of these 11 patients, 9 had clinical follow- up confirmation of appropriate grading of lesions, whereas 2 cases were proved to be underestimated by laryngoscopy owing to the absence of indirect signs of laryngeal skeleton fractures. Finally, in 2 of 15 (13%) patients, findings at laryngoscopy were consistent with grade 2 injuries. CT is the imaging modality of choice in cases of laryngeal injuries, giving valuable support to the physical findings and providing useful information for planning appropriate treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-131
Number of pages3
JournalEmergency Radiology
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Laryngoscopy
Wounds and Injuries
Tomography
Laryngeal Edema
Subcutaneous Emphysema
Lacerations
Skeleton
Hematoma
Physical Examination
Cartilage
Hospital Emergency Service
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • CT, emergency
  • Larynx, CT
  • Larynx, injuries
  • Larynx, surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Scaglione, M., Pinto, F., Romano, L., Grassi, R., Pinto, A., & Lencioni, R. (1997). Computed tomographic diagnosis of traumatic laryngeal injuries. Emergency Radiology, 4(3), 129-131. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01508101

Computed tomographic diagnosis of traumatic laryngeal injuries. / Scaglione, M.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Grassi, R.; Pinto, A.; Lencioni, Riccardo.

In: Emergency Radiology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1997, p. 129-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scaglione, M, Pinto, F, Romano, L, Grassi, R, Pinto, A & Lencioni, R 1997, 'Computed tomographic diagnosis of traumatic laryngeal injuries', Emergency Radiology, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 129-131. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01508101
Scaglione M, Pinto F, Romano L, Grassi R, Pinto A, Lencioni R. Computed tomographic diagnosis of traumatic laryngeal injuries. Emergency Radiology. 1997;4(3):129-131. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01508101
Scaglione, M. ; Pinto, F. ; Romano, L. ; Grassi, R. ; Pinto, A. ; Lencioni, Riccardo. / Computed tomographic diagnosis of traumatic laryngeal injuries. In: Emergency Radiology. 1997 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 129-131.
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