Compressibility of water as a function of temperature and pressure

Rana A Fine, Frank J Millero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

240 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The isothermal compressibility of water from 0 to 100 °C and 0 to 1000 bar has been determined from Wilson's sound velocity measurements which have been normalized to Kell's 1 atm values. The isothermal compressibilities determined from the sound velocities have been fit, with a maximum deviation in compressibility of ±0.016 × 10-6 bar-1, to an extended bulk modulus equation V 0P/ (V0 - Vp) = B + A1P + A2P 2, where V0 and Vp are the specific volume at an applied pressure of zero and P; and B, A1 and A2 are temperature dependent constants. Our specific volume results are in reasonable agreement with the work of Kell and Whalley at low pressures; however, our results at high pressures (1000 bar) disagree by as much as 169 ppm (the average deviation is approximately 115 ppm). A comparison of the compressibilities indicates a parabolic shift in Kell and Whalley's work with a maximum of approximately 0.205 × 10-6 bar-1 at 400 bar and 5 °C. Since the velocity of sound data is extremely reliable ( ±- 0.2 m/sec) and the maximum error in the compressibilities derived from the sound data is within ± 0.016 × 10-6 bar-1, our PVT results based upon the sound data are more accurate than any direct measurements made to date.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5529-5536
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of Chemical Physics
Volume59
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1973

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Compressibility
compressibility
Water
Acoustic wave velocity
water
acoustic velocity
acoustics
Density (specific gravity)
Temperature
temperature
deviation
Acoustic waves
Acoustic variables measurement
bulk modulus
velocity measurement
Velocity measurement
low pressure
Elastic moduli
shift

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Compressibility of water as a function of temperature and pressure. / Fine, Rana A; Millero, Frank J.

In: The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 59, No. 10, 1973, p. 5529-5536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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