Comprehensive processing, display and analysis for in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging

Andrew A Maudsley, A. Darkazanli, J. R. Alger, L. O. Hall, N. Schuff, C. Studholme, Y. Yu, A. Ebel, A. Frew, D. Goldgof, Y. Gu, R. Pagare, F. Rousseau, K. Sivasankaran, B. J. Soher, P. Weber, K. Young, X. Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Image reconstruction for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) requires specialized spatial and spectral data processing methods and benefits from the use of several sources of prior information that are not commonly available, including MRI-derived tissue segmentation, morphological analysis and spectral characteristics of the observed metabolites. In addition, incorporating information obtained from MRI data can enhance the display of low-resolution metabolite images and multiparametric and regional statistical analysis methods can improve detection of altered metabolite distributions. As a result, full MRSI processing and analysis can involve multiple processing steps and several different data types. In this paper, a processing environment is described that integrates and automates these data processing and analysis functions for imaging of proton metabolite distributions in the normal human brain. The capabilities include normalization of metabolite signal intensities and transformation into a common spatial reference frame, thereby allowing the formation of a database of MR-measured human metabolite values as a function of acquisition, spatial and subject parameters. This development is carried out under the MIDAS project (Metabolite Imaging and Data Analysis System), which provides an integrated set of MRI and MRSI processing functions. It is anticipated that further development and distribution of these capabilities will facilitate more widespread use of MRSI for diagnostic imaging, encourage the development of standardized MRSI acquisition, processing and analysis methods and enable improved mapping of metabolite distributions in the human brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)492-503
Number of pages12
JournalNMR in Biomedicine
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

Fingerprint

Metabolites
Display devices
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic resonance
Imaging techniques
Processing
Magnetic resonance imaging
Computer-Assisted Image Processing
Normal Distribution
Brain
Diagnostic Imaging
Information Systems
Protons
Databases
Image reconstruction
Statistical methods
Tissue

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Data processing
  • MR spectroscopic imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Spectroscopy
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Maudsley, A. A., Darkazanli, A., Alger, J. R., Hall, L. O., Schuff, N., Studholme, C., ... Zhu, X. (2006). Comprehensive processing, display and analysis for in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging. NMR in Biomedicine, 19(4), 492-503. https://doi.org/10.1002/nbm.1025

Comprehensive processing, display and analysis for in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging. / Maudsley, Andrew A; Darkazanli, A.; Alger, J. R.; Hall, L. O.; Schuff, N.; Studholme, C.; Yu, Y.; Ebel, A.; Frew, A.; Goldgof, D.; Gu, Y.; Pagare, R.; Rousseau, F.; Sivasankaran, K.; Soher, B. J.; Weber, P.; Young, K.; Zhu, X.

In: NMR in Biomedicine, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.06.2006, p. 492-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maudsley, AA, Darkazanli, A, Alger, JR, Hall, LO, Schuff, N, Studholme, C, Yu, Y, Ebel, A, Frew, A, Goldgof, D, Gu, Y, Pagare, R, Rousseau, F, Sivasankaran, K, Soher, BJ, Weber, P, Young, K & Zhu, X 2006, 'Comprehensive processing, display and analysis for in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging', NMR in Biomedicine, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 492-503. https://doi.org/10.1002/nbm.1025
Maudsley, Andrew A ; Darkazanli, A. ; Alger, J. R. ; Hall, L. O. ; Schuff, N. ; Studholme, C. ; Yu, Y. ; Ebel, A. ; Frew, A. ; Goldgof, D. ; Gu, Y. ; Pagare, R. ; Rousseau, F. ; Sivasankaran, K. ; Soher, B. J. ; Weber, P. ; Young, K. ; Zhu, X. / Comprehensive processing, display and analysis for in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging. In: NMR in Biomedicine. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 492-503.
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