Complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types prepared by inkjet printing technology

Tao Xu, Weixin Zhao, Jian Ming Zhu, Mohammad Z. Albanna, James J. Yoo, Anthony Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

287 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to develop a versatile method for fabricating complex and heterogeneous three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using simultaneous ink-jetting of multiple cell types. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), canine smooth muscle cells (dSMCs), and bovine aortic endothelial cells (bECs), were separately mixed with ionic cross-linker calcium chloride (CaCl2), loaded into separate ink cartridges and printed using a modified thermal inkjet printer. The three cell types were delivered layer-by-layer to pre-determined locations in a sodium alginate-collagen composite located in a chamber under the printer. The reaction between CaCl2 and sodium alginate resulted in a rapid formation of a solid composite gel and the printed cells were anchored in designated areas within the gel. The printing process was repeated for several cycles leading to a complex 3D multi-cell hybrid construct. The biological functions of the 3D printed constructs were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Each of the printed cell types maintained their viability and normal proliferation rates, phenotypic expression, and physiological functions within the heterogeneous constructs. The bioprinted constructs were able to survive and mature into functional tissues with adequate vascularization in vivo. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types using inkjet printing technology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-139
Number of pages10
JournalBiomaterials
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Printing
Sodium alginate
Tissue
Technology
Ink
Gels
Calcium Chloride
Calcium chloride
Endothelial cells
Composite materials
Stem cells
Collagen
Muscle
Cells
Hybrid Cells
Amniotic Fluid
Fluids
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Canidae
Stem Cells

Keywords

  • Composite tissue
  • Heterogeneous cell constructs
  • Inkjet bioprinting
  • Three-dimensional printing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types prepared by inkjet printing technology. / Xu, Tao; Zhao, Weixin; Zhu, Jian Ming; Albanna, Mohammad Z.; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 130-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xu, Tao ; Zhao, Weixin ; Zhu, Jian Ming ; Albanna, Mohammad Z. ; Yoo, James J. ; Atala, Anthony. / Complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types prepared by inkjet printing technology. In: Biomaterials. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 130-139.
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