Completed suicide in chronic pain

David A Fishbain, M. Goldberg, R. S. Rosomoff, H. Rosomoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although convergent lines of evidence indicate that one can expect a high rate of suicide completion for chronic pain patients, this problem has not previously been investigated. Follow-up data from our pain center revealed three chronic pain patients (two men and one woman) who completed suicide. These three cases are presented. The sequential nature of the data enabled us to calculate suicide rates for our chronic pain population and subsamples of this population: 16.5 women per year; 29.3 men per year; 57.1 white men and 34.9 white women in the age range of 35-64 years per year; and 78.6 white worker compensation men in the age range of 35-64 years per year. Calculation of the 95% confidence interval and comparison of these suicide rates to the general population of the United States using the Z statistic indicated that all chronic pain patient suicide rates were significantly greater than that of the general population. White men, white women, and white worker compensation men with chronic pain in the age range of 35-64 years are twice, three, and three times as likely, respectively, as their counterparts in the general population to die by suicide. Although no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the small suicide sample, these case reports indicate a need for further studies of chronic pain patient suicide rates at other pain centers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-36
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume7
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Chronic Pain
Suicide
Pain Clinics
Workers' Compensation
Population
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Fishbain, D. A., Goldberg, M., Rosomoff, R. S., & Rosomoff, H. (1991). Completed suicide in chronic pain. Clinical Journal of Pain, 7(1), 29-36.

Completed suicide in chronic pain. / Fishbain, David A; Goldberg, M.; Rosomoff, R. S.; Rosomoff, H.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.01.1991, p. 29-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fishbain, DA, Goldberg, M, Rosomoff, RS & Rosomoff, H 1991, 'Completed suicide in chronic pain', Clinical Journal of Pain, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 29-36.
Fishbain DA, Goldberg M, Rosomoff RS, Rosomoff H. Completed suicide in chronic pain. Clinical Journal of Pain. 1991 Jan 1;7(1):29-36.
Fishbain, David A ; Goldberg, M. ; Rosomoff, R. S. ; Rosomoff, H. / Completed suicide in chronic pain. In: Clinical Journal of Pain. 1991 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 29-36.
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