Compensation and non-compensation chronic pain patients compared for DSM-III operational diagnoses

David A. Fishbain, Myron Goldberg, E. Labbe, Renee Steele, Hubert Rosomoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two hundred and eighty-three mixed chronic pain patients, consecutive admissions, were diagnostically evaluated as per DSM-III, Axis I, Axis II or personality type psychiatric operational criteria. Controlling for primary organic treatment diagnosis, age and race, statistical comparisons were made between male compensation patients (n = 93) and male non-compensation patients (n = 23) and between female compensation patients (n = 38) and female non-compensation patients (n = 28) for all DSM-III diagnoses. Male compensation patients were significantly overrepresented for these diagnostic groups: conversion disorder (somatosensory type); combined personality disorders; and passive-aggressive personality disorder. Male non-compensation patients were significantly overrepresented for these diagnostic groups: no diagnosis on Axis I; combined personality types; and compulsive personality type. Female compensation patients were significantly overrepresented for conversion disorder (somatosensory) only. Female non-compensation patients were significantly overrepresented for generalized anxiety disorder and combined anxiety syndromes. Compensation chronic pain patients may be at risk for some psychiatric disorders not previously identified: conversion disorder (somatosensory), and personality disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-206
Number of pages10
JournalPain
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1988

Keywords

  • Chronic pain patients
  • DSM-III
  • Operational diagnoses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Psychology

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