Comparison of procedural outcomes between morning and afternoon colonoscopies performed by colorectal surgeons

Shrey Modi, Omar Picado, Caroline Fiser, Maya Lubarsky, Bhuwan Giri, Vanessa Hui, Luanne Force, Floriano Marchetti, Laurence R. Sands, Nivedh V. Paluvoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and objective: Colonoscopy is a common procedure performed by colorectal surgeons for screening, diagnosis, and surveillance of various colorectal diseases. Existing literature has conflicting data on quality outcomes of colonoscopies performed in the afternoon and the morning schedules and only includes colonoscopies performed by gastroenterologists. We sought to analyze procedural outcomes between morning and afternoon colonoscopies performed by colorectal surgeons. Data sources and main outcome measures: A retrospective chart review of colonoscopies performed by colorectal surgeons at a tertiary care center from October 2018 through July 2020 was performed. Complete colonoscopies with documented times were included. Patients with colonic resection and incomplete colonoscopy were excluded. Main outcome measures adenoma and polyp detection rates and colonoscopy time variables were compared between morning and afternoon colonoscopies. Results: A total of 781 patients were analyzed. Colonoscopies were evenly distributed during shifts (49% morning and 51% afternoon). The overall polyp and adenoma detection rates were 46% and 29%, respectively. There were no significant differences in adenoma and polyp detection rates and colonoscopy duration between morning and afternoon colonoscopies. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that history of prior polypectomy was an independent predictor of adenoma detection rate (OR: 2.17, 95% CI 1.33–3.54, p = 0.002) and was associated with significantly increased colonoscopy times in afternoon shift. Conclusion: There were no differences in quality outcomes of adenoma and polyp detection rates between morning and afternoon colonoscopies performed by colorectal surgeons. In addition to known predictors, cecal intubation time and history of polypectomy were also independent predictors of adenoma detection rate. Patients with prior polypectomy had increased colonoscopy times in afternoon shift. Since colorectal surgeons perform higher proportion of diagnostic and surveillance colonoscopies, these patients may be better suited for colonoscopies in morning shift.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSurgical endoscopy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ADR
  • Colonoscopy
  • Colorectal surgeons
  • Morning and afternoon
  • Polypectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of procedural outcomes between morning and afternoon colonoscopies performed by colorectal surgeons'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this